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conferences

You know, when people get together and talk about stuff.

LibX 2.0

Godmar Back, Virginia Tech

Since its inception, the LibX browser plugin has been adopted by over 500 libraries to provide access to their services at the user's point of need. We are now developing LibX 2.0, a community platform that allows anybody to create, share, and deploy library services in a distributed and decentralized fashion. We'll describe the technology used in LibX 2.0, with a particular emphasis on the developer API and the deployment infrastructure facilitating this community engagement.

 

How I Failed To Present on Using DVCS for Managing Archival Metadata

Mark A. Matienzo, The New York Public Library

Building on Galen Charlton's investigations into distributed version control systems for metadata management, I was going to offer a prototype system for managing archival finding aids in EAD (Encoded Archival Description). My prototype relied on distributed version control and uses post-commit hooks to initiate indexing and publishing processes. However, I ran into some serious barriers in my implementation, and my talk will focus on the fundamental problem of algorithmically diffing and expressing patches for XML documents

Open Up Your Repository With a SWORD!

Ed Summers & Mike Giarlo, Library of Congress

Simple Web Service Offering Repository Deposit (SWORD) is a lightweight protocol for depositing repository objects over HTTP, developed by the JISC. SWORD is a profile of the Atom Publishing Protocol (RFC 5023), geared to the digital library community. This presentation will discuss the SWORD specification, highlighting how it could be used to provide a deposit API for your repository infrastructure.

 

The Dashboard Initiative

Birkin James Diana, Brown University

How to monitor, in near-real-time, usage of all the great services we build and offer? Often stats-production isn't built-in to our services, and when it is, the lack of standard output makes centralized monitoring difficult. Brown's Library is experimenting with a valued corporate solution, building standardized stats output and trend visualization for new and existing projects -- and centrally exposing this info. This talk will cover our dashboard/widget implementation.

 

RESTafarian-ism at the NLA

Terence Ingram, National Library of Australia

Two years ago the National Library of Australia decided to go the route of SOA, particularly REST web services. Since then we have developed a stack of them for varying projects. This talk will expose a few of those services (that provide MARCXML, MODS, METS, Identity information and Copyright Status), highlight some of the technology choices and give some idea of the success of this approach.

 

LuSql: (Quickly and easily) Getting your data from your DBMS into Lucene

Glen Newton, CISTI, National Research Council

Need to move your data from your DBMS to Lucene? The recently released LuSql allows you to do this in a single line. LuSql is a high performance, low use barrier application for getting DBMS data into Lucene. This presentation will introduce LuSql, and give a brief tutorial on simple to crazy complicated use cases, including per document sub-queries and out-of-band document transformations.

 

Like a can opener for your data silo: simple access through AtomPub and Jangle

Ross Singer, Talis

Jangle is an open specification to apply the Atom Publishing Protocol (AtomPub) to library systems and data. It provides a simple RESTful interface that can be accessed with common Atom Syndication and AtomPub clients making it easier to integrate library data into other applications. This presentation will describe the architecture of Jangle, show how it works and give some ideas as to how it could be used for common integration problems.

 

A Bookless Future for Libraries: A Comedy in 3 Acts

Stefano Mazzocchi
Keynote Address

 
QuickTime Video:
[Footage of the speaker was inadvertently not captured.]

 

Video on Internet Archive

 

Why libraries should embrace Linked Data

Anders Söderbäck, National Library of Sweden

The promise of Linked Data is not that it is another way of aggregating data. For too long have library data been trapped within data-silos only accessible through obscure protocols. Why is access to library data still an issue? Letting everyone access and link to library data lets anyone build the next killer app. LIBRIS, the Swedish Union Catalogue is, since the beginning of this year, available as Linked Data. We discuss how and why.
 

See you next year in Asheville

Congratulations to Asheville, North Carolina for being voted as the host city for Code4Lib 2010. Thanks go to all who voted and to all the sites that submitted a proposal as all would have been excellent locations.

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