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conferences

You know, when people get together and talk about stuff.

FreeCite - An Open Source Free-Text Citation Parser

Chris Shoemaker, Public Display

FreeCite is an open-source Ruby On Rails application that parses document citations into OpenURL-style fielded data. You can use it either as a web application or through a RESTful Web API. We will explain some difficulties we encountered in developing FreeCite, describe the current architecture, discuss some of the enhancements we would like to see and explain how you can run your own server and/or improve the FreeCite software.
 

The Rising Sun: Making the most of Solr power

Erik Hatcher, Lucid Imagination

Y'all have been using Solr for a good couple of years now. It rocks - we know that. But there is always room for improvement. Rapid fire, Erik will go through a number of ways to improve existing Solr usage in performance, relevancy, and user interface.
 
QuickTime Video:

 

Complete faceting

Toke Eskildsen & Mikkel Kamstrup Erlandsen, State and University Library, Denmark

We wanted search result faceting at our library. Just the basics with tags for material type, author and such. We found a suitable hammer and now have distributed faceting for 100 million documents with 10 times that number of unique tags. All in sync with Lucene indexes. We had to cheat a bit, but you don't see that when we wave our hands. We'll talk about why brute force and cheating is fine.

 

What We Talk About When We Talk About FRBR

Jodi Schneider, Appalachian State University; William Denton, York University

When vendors talk about FRBRization they usually mean grouping manifestations into works. When we talk about FRBR, we mean something far richer and rewarding. What FRBRization algorithms are available and in use now, how well do they work, and how do they present the relationships? We'll look at the LC FRBR Display Tool, OCLC's work-set algorithm, LibraryThing's user-contributed groupings, and VTLS's system. We'll discuss their benefits, flaws, and what we need for the future.

Extending biblios, the open source web based metadata editor

Chris Catalfo, LibraryThing

This talk will detail how to extend biblios, the open source web based metadata editor. It will show how to implement two possible enhancements to biblios: 1) develop a network storage folder which uses CouchDB as its backend and 2) develop an editor which supports editing Dublin Core records. The goal of this talk is to empower other developers to extend and improve biblios.
 

A New Platform for Open Data - Introducing ‡biblios.net Web Services

Joshua Ferraro, LibLime

‡biblios.net is a new Software-as-a-Service offering based on the open-source ‡biblios metadata editor. ‡biblios.net provides free access to the world's largest database of openly-licensed library records--available under the Open Data Commons license and accessible via ‡biblios.net_Web_Services (BWS). BWS is a simple set of APIs that enable applications to interact with the database. This talk introduces BWS and provides examples of how it can be used by libraries/museums/archives as a platform for storing Openly Licensed Data.

Blacklight as a unified discovery platform

Bess Sadler, University of Virginia

At UVA, Blacklight is more than an open source OPAC; it also provides a unified discovery framework for items from our institutional repository, our art museum, and our geospatial data repository, and each kind of object has appropriate specific behaviors. This talk will discuss how we put this together, and how you can too.

 

A new frontier - the Open Library Environment (OLE)

Timothy McGeary, Lehigh University

This presentation will be a progress update on the design of the Open Library Environment. At the time of the conference, business process modeling workshops will have been completed, thus allowing for presenting how the service-oriented architecture is taking shape. There will also be details on how to participate in the project.

 

Sebastian Hammer, Keynote Address

Sebastian Hammer, Index Data
Keynote Address

 
QuickTime Video:

 

Video on Internet Archive

 

Presentation:
Slides in PDF

djatoka for djummies

Kevin S. Clarke, Appalachian State University; John Fereira, Cornell University

What kind of dummy would volunteer to do a presentation on a product he hasn't even tried before? Perhaps the kind that has three weeks off from work in Dec./Jan. Or, perhaps the kind that hopes others will join him in this radical experiment. I'm very interested in learning more about djatoka so propose to share what I learn over the next two months in a twenty minute presentation.

 

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