code4lib 2012

Search Engine Relevancy Tuning - A Static Rank Framework for Solr/Lucene - Mike Schultz

Search Engine Relevancy Tuning - A Static Rank Framework for Solr/Lucene

  • Mike Schultz, formerly Summon Search Architect, mike.schultz@gmail.com

code4lib 2012, Thursday, February 9 2012, 11:40-12:00

Solr/Lucene provides a lot of flexibility for adjusting relevancy scoring and improving search results. Roughly speaking there are two areas of concern: Firstly, a 'dynamic rank' calculation that is a function of the user query and document text fields. And secondly, a 'static rank' which is independent of the query and generally is a function of non-text document metadata. In this talk I will outline an easily understood, hand-tunable static rank system with a minimal number of parameters.

How people search the library from a single search box - Cory Lown

How people search the library from a single search box

  • Cory Lown, North Carolina State University Libraries, cory_lown@ncsu.edu

code4lib 2012, Wednesday, February 8 2012, 09:35-09:55

Discovering Digital Library User Behavior with Google Analytics - Kirk Hess

Discovering Digital Library User Behavior with Google Analytics

  • Kirk Hess, Digital Humanities Specialist, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, kirkhess@illinois.edu

code4lib 2012, Wednesday, February 8 2012, 09:15-09:35

Digital library administrators are frequently asked questions like "How many times was that document downloaded", or "What’s the most popular book in our collection?" Conventional web logging software, such as AWStats, can only answer those questions some of the time, and there’s always the question of whether or not the data is polluted by non-users, such as spiders and crawlers. Google Analytics, (http://google.com/analytics/) , a JavaScript-based solution that excludes most crawlers and bots, shows how users found your site and how they explored it.

The Golden Road (To Unlimited Devotion): Building a Socially Constructed Archive of Grateful Dead Artifacts - Robin Chandler

The Golden Road (To Unlimited Devotion): Building a Socially Constructed Archive of Grateful Dead Artifacts

  • Robin Chandler, University of California (Santa Cruz), chandler [at] ucsc [dot] edu
  • Susan Chesley Perry, University of California (Santa Cruz), chesley [at] ucsc [dot] edu
  • Kevin S. Clarke, University of California (Santa Cruz), ksclarke [at] ucsc [dot] edu

code4lib 2012, Tuesday 7 February 2012, 14:20-14:40 (slides available online)

The Grateful Dead Archive at the University of California (Santa Cruz) is a collection of over 600 linear feet of material, including: business records, photographs, posters, fan envelopes, tickets, video, audio (oral histories, interviews and music) and 3-d objects such as stage props and band merchandise. In addition, with the release of the Grateful Dead Archive Online website in 2012, the Archive will start actively collecting artifacts from an enthusiastic community of Grateful Dead fans.

Your UI can make or break the application (to the user, anyway) - Robin Schaaf

Your UI can make or break the application (to the user, anyway)

  • Robin Schaaf, University of Notre Dame, schaaf.4@nd.edu

code4lib 2012, Thursday 9 February 2012, 11:00-11:20

UI development is hard and too often ends up as an after-thought to computer programmers - if you were a CS major in college I'll bet you didn't have many, if any, design courses. I'll talk about how to involve the users upfront with design and some common pitfalls of this approach. I'll also make a case for why you should do the screen design before a single line of code is written. And I'll throw in some ideas for increasing usability and attractiveness of your web applications. I'd like to make a case study of the UI development of our open source ERMS.

Quick and <del>Dirty</del> Clean Usability: Rapid Prototyping with Bootstrap - Shaun Ellis

Quick and Dirty Clean Usability: Rapid Prototyping with Bootstrap

  • Shaun Ellis, Princeton University Libraries, shaune@princeton.edu

code4lib 2012, Thursday 9 February 2012, 11:20-11:40

"The code itself is unimportant; a project is only as useful as people actually find it." - Linus Torvalds [1]

Usability has been a buzzword for some time now, but what is the process for making the the transition toward a better user experience, and hence, better designed library sites? I will discuss the one facet of the process my team is using to redesign the Finding Aids site for Princeton University Libraries (still in development). The approach involves the use of rapid prototyping, with Bootstrap [2], to make sure we are on track with what users and stakeholders expect up front, and throughout the development process.

Design for Developers - Lisa Kurt

Design for Developers

  • Lisa Kurt, University of Nevada, Reno, lkurt@unr.edu

code4lib 2012, Tuesday 7 February 2012, 14:00-14:20

Users expect good design. This talk will delve into what makes really great design, what to look for, and how to do it. Learn the principles of great design to take your applications, user interfaces, and projects to a higher level. With years of experience in graphic design and illustration, Lisa will discuss design principles, trends, process, tools, and development. Design examples will be from her own projects as well as a variety from industry. You’ll walk away with design knowledge that you can apply immediately to a variety of applications and a number of top notch go-to resources to get you up and running.

HathiTrust Large Scale Search: Scalability meets Usability - Tom Burton-West

HathiTrust Large Scale Search: Scalability meets Usability

  • Tom Burton-West, DLPS, University of Michigan Library, tburtonw AT umich edu
  • Slides

code4lib 2012, Tuesday 7 February 2012, 13:00-13:20

HathiTrust Large-Scale search provides full-text search services over nearly 10 million full-text books using Solr for the back-end. Our index is around 5-6 TB in size and each shard contains over 3 billion unique terms due to content in over 400 languages and dirty OCR.

Searching the full-text of 10 million books often results in very large result sets. By conference time a number of features designed to help users narrow down large result sets and to do exploratory searching will either be in production or in preparation for release. There are often trade-offs between implementing desirable user features and keeping response time reasonable in addition to the traditional search trade-offs of precision versus recall.

ALL TEH METADATAS! or How we use RDF to keep all of the digital object metadata formats thrown at us - Declan Fleming

ALL TEH METADATAS! or How we use RDF to keep all of the digital object metadata formats thrown at us

  • Declan Fleming, University of California, San Diego, dfleming AT ucsd DING edu

code4lib 2012, Tuesday 7 February 2012, 11:40-12:00

HTML5 Microdata and Schema.org - Jason Ronallo

HTML5 Microdata and Schema.org

  • Jason Ronallo, North Carolina State University Libraries, jason_ronallo@ncsu.edu

code4lib 2012, Tuesday 7 February 2012, 11:20-11:40

When the big search engines announced support for HTML5 microdata and the schema.org vocabularies, the balance of power for semantic markup in HTML shifted.

  • What is microdata?
  • Where does microdata fit with regards to other approaches like RDFa and microformats?
  • Where do libraries stand in the worldview of Schema.org and what can they do about it?
  • How can implementing microdata and schema.org optimize your sites for search engines?
  • What tools are available?

Slides
Related Code4Lib Journal article
Video starts at 01:05:30

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