code4lib 2009

Visualizing Media Archives: A Case Study

Chris Beer, WGBH Interactive; Courtney Michael, WGBH Media Library and Archives

A scholar walks into your archive and asks “what do you have for me?” You point to your finding aids and set them a-slogging. What if they could orient themselves to, and interact with, the collection dynamically online? What if they could see the connections between collections, series, even items? We will present our latest approach to showcasing the breadth and depth of media collections using rich cataloging and data visualization techniques.
 

The Open Platform Strategy: what it means for library developers

Edward M. Corrado, Binghamton University

Ex Libris has announced an Open Platform Strategy. As part of this approach they will supply well-documented “Open-APIs” and Web services. They have also created EL Commons, a collaborative Web-based platform that includes a Developer Zone and a code-sharing platform for customers. OCLC also has an Open-API approach with the WorldCat Grid. This presentation will investigate what this Open-API strategy means for customers and why (or why not) libraries should support this “open”-proprietary strategy.
 

If You Love Something...Set it Free

Ian Davis, Talis
Keynote Address

 
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Video on Internet Archive

 

Presentation:
Slides on Slideshare

Freebasing for Fun and Enhancement

Sean Hannan, Johns Hopkins University
Freebase is a vast, query-able resource for hierarchical factual information. Through APIs, we can use this data and data relationships to enhance library services. Want to feature items in your catalog by local authors? Don't waste time hand-selecting, just pull dynamically from Freebase and your local collections. This presentation will cover how to get information out of Freebase via APIs, an introduction to MQL, and examples of integration with existing library services.
 

Great facets, like your relevance, but can I have links to Amazon and Google Book Search?

Richard Wallis, Talis

Solr enabled great innovation and prompted even more. But they are still just OPACs. Users want much more than a library catalogue alone can provide. This presentation shares some of the experience, code, and techniques used to embed a multiplicity of extension points in to an OPAC interface in a consistent way that can be built upon by others. From author videos to LibraryThing Common Knowledge by way of an audio page reader and beyond.
 

FreeCite - An Open Source Free-Text Citation Parser

Chris Shoemaker, Public Display

FreeCite is an open-source Ruby On Rails application that parses document citations into OpenURL-style fielded data. You can use it either as a web application or through a RESTful Web API. We will explain some difficulties we encountered in developing FreeCite, describe the current architecture, discuss some of the enhancements we would like to see and explain how you can run your own server and/or improve the FreeCite software.
 

The Rising Sun: Making the most of Solr power

Erik Hatcher, Lucid Imagination

Y'all have been using Solr for a good couple of years now. It rocks - we know that. But there is always room for improvement. Rapid fire, Erik will go through a number of ways to improve existing Solr usage in performance, relevancy, and user interface.
 
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Complete faceting

Toke Eskildsen & Mikkel Kamstrup Erlandsen, State and University Library, Denmark

We wanted search result faceting at our library. Just the basics with tags for material type, author and such. We found a suitable hammer and now have distributed faceting for 100 million documents with 10 times that number of unique tags. All in sync with Lucene indexes. We had to cheat a bit, but you don't see that when we wave our hands. We'll talk about why brute force and cheating is fine.

 

What We Talk About When We Talk About FRBR

Jodi Schneider, Appalachian State University; William Denton, York University

When vendors talk about FRBRization they usually mean grouping manifestations into works. When we talk about FRBR, we mean something far richer and rewarding. What FRBRization algorithms are available and in use now, how well do they work, and how do they present the relationships? We'll look at the LC FRBR Display Tool, OCLC's work-set algorithm, LibraryThing's user-contributed groupings, and VTLS's system. We'll discuss their benefits, flaws, and what we need for the future.

Extending biblios, the open source web based metadata editor

Chris Catalfo, LibraryThing

This talk will detail how to extend biblios, the open source web based metadata editor. It will show how to implement two possible enhancements to biblios: 1) develop a network storage folder which uses CouchDB as its backend and 2) develop an editor which supports editing Dublin Core records. The goal of this talk is to empower other developers to extend and improve biblios.
 

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