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Bisson, Casey: How to identify context inside the WordPress dashboard

planet code4lib - Fri, 2014-01-31 04:27

On wp-hackers, Haluk Karamete asked:

on admin pages, how can I detect that the current admin is dealing with a cpt?

Andrew Nacin answered:

get_current_screen()->post_type.

[But] this will also specify a post type when it’s a taxonomy being edited. To filter that out, ensure that get_current_screen()->base == 'post', which is [true] for edit.php, post-new.php, and post.php (for all post types).

Haluk didn’t elaborate on the cause of the question, but the answer is very good advice for those seeking to conditionally enqueue JS and styles only for specific post types.

Bisson, Casey: How to identify context inside the WordPress dashboard

planet code4lib - Fri, 2014-01-31 04:27

On wp-hackers, Haluk Karamete asked:

on admin pages, how can I detect that the current admin is dealing with a cpt?

Andrew Nacin answered:

get_current_screen()->post_type.

[But] this will also specify a post type when it’s a taxonomy being edited. To filter that out, ensure that get_current_screen()->base == 'post', which is [true] for edit.php, post-new.php, and post.php (for all post types).

Haluk didn’t elaborate on the cause of the question, but the answer is very good advice for those seeking to conditionally enqueue JS and styles only for specific post types.

ALA Equitable Access to Electronic Content: Policy discussions continue at ALA midwinter meeting

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 22:19

Guardian Editor Spencer Ackerman.

More than 12,000 librarians, vendors and library supporters attended this year’s 2014 American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting, which took place in Philadelphia from January 24-28, 2014. Large audiences participated in ALA Washington Office policy sessions, including conference programs that explored E-rate funding, copyright lawsuits, ebook access and internet filtering.

On Saturday, more than one hundred attendees gathered to hear insider information on last June’s National Security Agency (NSA) leak from Guardian Editor Spencer Ackerman during the session “NSA Under a Microscope: The Story Behind the Revelations About the NSA Surveillance Programs.” In his lecture, Ackerman explained that NSA leaker Edward Snowden’s actions largely confirmed the suspicions held by national security reporters and civil liberties watchdog groups.

“All of the sudden, I had my hands on an extensive trove of NSA documents that gave credence to a lot of what I had previously considered kind of conspiratorial talk about the scope of government surveillance and that upset everyone,” said Ackerman.

Immediately after Ackerman spoke, Patrice McDermott, director of Openthegovernment.org, moderated questions from the audience. As part of the conference session, ALA Washington staff previewed videos that advocates can use for library funding during National Library Legislative Day.

Google Policy Manager Wilson White with conference reporter Brad Martin.

Over the next two days, crowds of conference attendees lined up to try on Google Glass, the new wearable computers from Google that’s worn like a pair of glasses. Wilson L. White, public policy manager of Glass at Google, and technical members of the Google Glass Team, demonstrated the new devices to eager attendees. ALA Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) and Google, Inc. jointly sponsored the demonstration.

During other ALA Washington Office sessions, publishing and library experts discussed the best ways that libraries can bring together authors and readers in the digital age. In another session, Google Legal Counsel Fred von Lohmann discussed the Google Book Search lawsuit court ruling. Finally, library and policy detailed ALA’s vision for an E-rate 2.0 that better serves America’s libraries and communities.

The post Policy discussions continue at ALA midwinter meeting appeared first on District Dispatch.

ALA Equitable Access to Electronic Content: Policy discussions continue at ALA midwinter meeting

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 22:19

Guardian Editor Spencer Ackerman.

More than 12,000 librarians, vendors and library supporters attended this year’s 2014 American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting, which took place in Philadelphia from January 24-28, 2014. Large audiences participated in ALA Washington Office policy sessions, including conference programs that explored E-rate funding, copyright lawsuits, ebook access and internet filtering.

On Saturday, more than one hundred attendees gathered to hear insider information on last June’s National Security Agency (NSA) leak from Guardian Editor Spencer Ackerman during the session “NSA Under a Microscope: The Story Behind the Revelations About the NSA Surveillance Programs.” In his lecture, Ackerman explained that NSA leaker Edward Snowden’s actions largely confirmed the suspicions held by national security reporters and civil liberties watchdog groups.

“All of the sudden, I had my hands on an extensive trove of NSA documents that gave credence to a lot of what I had previously considered kind of conspiratorial talk about the scope of government surveillance and that upset everyone,” said Ackerman.

Immediately after Ackerman spoke, Patrice McDermott, director of Openthegovernment.org, moderated questions from the audience. As part of the conference session, ALA Washington staff previewed videos that advocates can use for library funding during National Library Legislative Day.

Google Policy Manager Wilson White with conference reporter Brad Martin.

Over the next two days, crowds of conference attendees lined up to try on Google Glass, the new wearable computers from Google that’s worn like a pair of glasses. Wilson L. White, public policy manager of Glass at Google, and technical members of the Google Glass Team, demonstrated the new devices to eager attendees. ALA Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) and Google, Inc. jointly sponsored the demonstration.

During other ALA Washington Office sessions, publishing and library experts discussed the best ways that libraries can bring together authors and readers in the digital age. In another session, Google Legal Counsel Fred von Lohmann discussed the Google Book Search lawsuit court ruling. Finally, library and policy detailed ALA’s vision for an E-rate 2.0 that better serves America’s libraries and communities.

The post Policy discussions continue at ALA midwinter meeting appeared first on District Dispatch.

Engard, Nicole: Bookmarks for January 30, 2014

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 20:30

Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on <a href=

  • ]project-open[ Open source project management system.
  • Fedena Fedena is a free & opensource school management software that has more features than a student information system. Use fedena to efficiently manage students, teachers, employees, courses & all the system & process related to your institution.

Digest powered by RSS Digest

The post Bookmarks for January 30, 2014 appeared first on What I Learned Today....

Related posts:

  1. Teach Students Open Source
  2. Google Librarian Newsletter
  3. Savvy vs Un-savvy

Engard, Nicole: Bookmarks for January 30, 2014

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 20:30

Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on <a href=

  • ]project-open[ Open source project management system.
  • Fedena Fedena is a free & opensource school management software that has more features than a student information system. Use fedena to efficiently manage students, teachers, employees, courses & all the system & process related to your institution.

Digest powered by RSS Digest

The post Bookmarks for January 30, 2014 appeared first on What I Learned Today....

Related posts:

  1. Teach Students Open Source
  2. Google Librarian Newsletter
  3. Savvy vs Un-savvy

Charlton, Galen: Duplicate holidays, and a question

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 19:29

One can, in fact, have too many holidays.

Koha uses the DateTime::Set Perl module when (among other things) calculating the next day the library is open. Unfortunately, the more special holidays you have in a Koha database, the more time DateTime::Set takes to initialize itself — and the time appears to grow faster than linearly with the number of holidays.

Jonathan Druart partially addressed this with his patch for bug 11112 by implementing some lazy initialization and caching for Koha::Calendar, but that doesn’t make DateTime::Set‘s constructor itself any faster.

Today I happened to be working on a Koha database that turned out to have duplicate rows in the special_holidays table. In other words, for a given library, there might be four rows all expressing that the library is closed on 15 August 2014. That database contains hundreds of duplicates, which results in an extra 1-3 seconds per circulation operation.

The duplication is not apparent in the calendar editor, alas.

So here’s my first question: has anybody else seen this in their Koha database? The following query will turn up duplicates:

SELECT branchcode, year, month, day, isexception, COUNT(*) FROM special_holidays GROUP BY 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 HAVING COUNT(*) > 1;

And my second question: assuming that this somehow came about during normal operation of Koha (as opposed to duplicate rows getting directly loaded into the database), does anybody have any ideas how this happened?

Charlton, Galen: Duplicate holidays, and a question

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 19:29

One can, in fact, have too many holidays.

Koha uses the DateTime::Set Perl module when (among other things) calculating the next day the library is open. Unfortunately, the more special holidays you have in a Koha database, the more time DateTime::Set takes to initialize itself — and the time appears to grow faster than linearly with the number of holidays.

Jonathan Druart partially addressed this with his patch for bug 11112 by implementing some lazy initialization and caching for Koha::Calendar, but that doesn’t make DateTime::Set‘s constructor itself any faster.

Today I happened to be working on a Koha database that turned out to have duplicate rows in the special_holidays table. In other words, for a given library, there might be four rows all expressing that the library is closed on 15 August 2014. That database contains hundreds of duplicates, which results in an extra 1-3 seconds per circulation operation.

The duplication is not apparent in the calendar editor, alas.

So here’s my first question: has anybody else seen this in their Koha database? The following query will turn up duplicates:

SELECT branchcode, year, month, day, isexception, COUNT(*) FROM special_holidays GROUP BY 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 HAVING COUNT(*) > 1;

And my second question: assuming that this somehow came about during normal operation of Koha (as opposed to duplicate rows getting directly loaded into the database), does anybody have any ideas how this happened?

Ng, Cynthia: Death to the Website Carousel

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 19:18

This is not by any means a new idea, but as I am in the process of redesigning the website, I did think about the carousel. The existing website doesn’t have one, but glancing at my WordPress statistics, the image carousel plugin review post has been getting the highest number of hits, and I have that post for a reason (that is I had to put one into the last site I did).

Should You Use a Carousel?

You know, there’s a website for that: www.shouldiuseacarousel.com (credit to @gollydamn for sending this my way)

Accessibility Issues

If that doesn’t convince you, shall I show you what the last site I worked on looks like with JavaScript turned off?

Okay, I understand not a lot of people have JavaScript turned off, but  a carousel or slider poses other accessibility issues.

Accessibility Break #1: No Auto Play & Controls

Nothing on a page should automatically play, move, what have you.

While the Web Consortium Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) allows for auto play, it still says users must have the ability to pause, stop or hide it. The techniques go on to say that the user should also have the ability to restart it using the same method as pausing.

How would a user pause or stop when they first open your page? Is it obvious? Are there both mouse and keyboard controls to do so?

Accessibility Break #2: Keyboard Accessibility

Ever try to using a page without a mouse? It’s not always easy, and worse when there is a carousel, because you normally don’t know that your focus is inside the carousel. (To be fully accessible, keyboard users should always know what link they have focus on.) Even if you do, how do you get out? Normally you have to tab through all the image/links in the carousel without knowing where the end is. WHERE IS THE END?!

On a side note: Whether a screen reader will read through them all or only the one displaying really depends on the code, whether there’s any alt text, and how the screen reader interacts with it. It’s hard to say, but if it does, you can only hope there aren’t 10+ images in the carousel.

Accessibility Break #3: Alt Text

I think by now we all know that you have to have “alt text” for images. While some carousels allow you to put in alt text, many of them don’t have it built in. Even if it does, did the writer remember to include a note on where the link goes to? I must admit I don’t even always remember to. This leads us to the next point.

Accessibility Break #4: Descriptive Link

I don’t think telling the user where the link goes is necessary if it just goes to a bigger version of the image, because that’s expected behaviour. Carousels, however, tend to lead you to another page, not to the larger size of an image. Somehow, you need to tell the user where the link goes. Since the link text can’t do that (because it’s an image), then your alt text needs to do it for you, but the person writing the alt text needs to remember.

But a Carousel Can be Fully Accessible Right?

Yes. I won’t deny that if you have a programmer who knows their stuff and understands accessibility, they could modify an existing or create a new carousel that is fully accessible. However, is it worth the time and effort? I can tell you that I haven’t found an existing plugin/library that meets accessibility criteria. The closest I’ve found is one of the Drupal ones with auto-play turned off.

Consider Usability & User Experience

If you’ve gotten this far and you’re still not convinced, then here are some more reasons.

Banner Blindness

If you’re not familiar with the term, I’m sure you’re familiar with the concept of banner blindness (coined back in 1998!). Basically, users tend to ignore anything that look like ads. It seems ignoring ad-like content is particularly true for anything at the top of the page, or in the sidebar.

User Frustration

While I have yet to actually read on any research about it (though I’m fairly sure it exists), I don’t know how often I’ve had users be frustrated with carousels and the like when they actually try to use, read, click on, or stop them.

Users Don’t Click on It & Even More Reasons

Conversion XL wrote a good summary on some of the statistics (Notre Dame saw 1% of clicks on their first slide and none on the others) and usability studies done, also covering some other reasons: taking users’ attention away from what’s important, and the problem of too many messages.

While geared towards libraries, Michael Schofield did a presentation on the Truth about Carousels at NEFLIN 2013 Tech Conference with some great points.

Finally, if you still must have a carousel, I found an article that covers some key features you should have if you still insist on using one.

Conclusion

TL;DR version: Please stop even thinking about it. You’ll just frustrate all your users.


Filed under: Web design

Ng, Cynthia: Death to the Website Carousel

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 19:18

This is not by any means a new idea, but as I am in the process of redesigning the website, I did think about the carousel. The existing website doesn’t have one, but glancing at my WordPress statistics, the image carousel plugin review post has been getting the highest number of hits, and I have that post for a reason (that is I had to put one into the last site I did).

Should You Use a Carousel?

You know, there’s a website for that: www.shouldiuseacarousel.com (credit to @gollydamn for sending this my way)

Accessibility Issues

If that doesn’t convince you, shall I show you what the last site I worked on looks like with JavaScript turned off?

Okay, I understand not a lot of people have JavaScript turned off, but  a carousel or slider poses other accessibility issues.

Accessibility Break #1: No Auto Play & Controls

Nothing on a page should automatically play, move, what have you.

While the Web Consortium Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) allows for auto play, it still says users must have the ability to pause, stop or hide it. The techniques go on to say that the user should also have the ability to restart it using the same method as pausing.

How would a user pause or stop when they first open your page? Is it obvious? Are there both mouse and keyboard controls to do so?

Accessibility Break #2: Keyboard Accessibility

Ever try to using a page without a mouse? It’s not always easy, and worse when there is a carousel, because you normally don’t know that your focus is inside the carousel. (To be fully accessible, keyboard users should always know what link they have focus on.) Even if you do, how do you get out? Normally you have to tab through all the image/links in the carousel without knowing where the end is. WHERE IS THE END?!

On a side note: Whether a screen reader will read through them all or only the one displaying really depends on the code, whether there’s any alt text, and how the screen reader interacts with it. It’s hard to say, but if it does, you can only hope there aren’t 10+ images in the carousel.

Accessibility Break #3: Alt Text

I think by now we all know that you have to have “alt text” for images. While some carousels allow you to put in alt text, many of them don’t have it built in. Even if it does, did the writer remember to include a note on where the link goes to? I must admit I don’t even always remember to. This leads us to the next point.

Accessibility Break #4: Descriptive Link

I don’t think telling the user where the link goes is necessary if it just goes to a bigger version of the image, because that’s expected behaviour. Carousels, however, tend to lead you to another page, not to the larger size of an image. Somehow, you need to tell the user where the link goes. Since the link text can’t do that (because it’s an image), then your alt text needs to do it for you, but the person writing the alt text needs to remember.

But a Carousel Can be Fully Accessible Right?

Yes. I won’t deny that if you have a programmer who knows their stuff and understands accessibility, they could modify an existing or create a new carousel that is fully accessible. However, is it worth the time and effort? I can tell you that I haven’t found an existing plugin/library that meets accessibility criteria. The closest I’ve found is one of the Drupal ones with auto-play turned off.

Consider Usability & User Experience

If you’ve gotten this far and you’re still not convinced, then here are some more reasons.

Banner Blindness

If you’re not familiar with the term, I’m sure you’re familiar with the concept of banner blindness (coined back in 1998!). Basically, users tend to ignore anything that look like ads. It seems ignoring ad-like content is particularly true for anything at the top of the page, or in the sidebar.

User Frustration

While I have yet to actually read on any research about it (though I’m fairly sure it exists), I don’t know how often I’ve had users be frustrated with carousels and the like when they actually try to use, read, click on, or stop them.

Users Don’t Click on It & Even More Reasons

Conversion XL wrote a good summary on some of the statistics (Notre Dame saw 1% of clicks on their first slide and none on the others) and usability studies done, also covering some other reasons: taking users’ attention away from what’s important, and the problem of too many messages.

While geared towards libraries, Michael Schofield did a presentation on the Truth about Carousels at NEFLIN 2013 Tech Conference with some great points.

Finally, if you still must have a carousel, I found an article that covers some key features you should have if you still insist on using one.

Conclusion

TL;DR version: Please stop even thinking about it. You’ll just frustrate all your users.


Filed under: Web design

ALA Equitable Access to Electronic Content: Free health webinar for public libraries

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 19:09

On March 27th, WebJunction will offer a free webinar on the Affordable Care Act. This session has limited space so please register quickly if interested.

Staying attuned to community needs and engaging strong partners to address those needs are hallmarks of 21st-century public librarianship. Libraries across the country have implemented inventive patron and partner engagement approaches in conjunction with the initial open enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act, which ends March 31, 2014. Join the Health Happens in Libraries project team for this interactive session, to discuss how your library can integrate these best practices into your local health information service priorities. Register for the WebJunction webinar “Health Happens in Libraries: Prioritizing Patron and Partner Engagement.”

Date: Thursday, March 27, 2014
Time: 2:00p.m. EST (11:00a.m. PST)
Register for the free event

If you cannot attend this live session, a recorded archive will be available to view at your convenience. Please sign up here if you’d like to receive notifications about this project, including when the archive is available.

The post Free health webinar for public libraries appeared first on District Dispatch.

ALA Equitable Access to Electronic Content: Free health webinar for public libraries

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 19:09

On March 27th, WebJunction will offer a free webinar on the Affordable Care Act. This session has limited space so please register quickly if interested.

Staying attuned to community needs and engaging strong partners to address those needs are hallmarks of 21st-century public librarianship. Libraries across the country have implemented inventive patron and partner engagement approaches in conjunction with the initial open enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act, which ends March 31, 2014. Join the Health Happens in Libraries project team for this interactive session, to discuss how your library can integrate these best practices into your local health information service priorities. Register for the WebJunction webinar “Health Happens in Libraries: Prioritizing Patron and Partner Engagement.”

Date: Thursday, March 27, 2014
Time: 2:00p.m. EST (11:00a.m. PST)
Register for the free event

If you cannot attend this live session, a recorded archive will be available to view at your convenience. Please sign up here if you’d like to receive notifications about this project, including when the archive is available.

The post Free health webinar for public libraries appeared first on District Dispatch.

code4lib: Code4Lib 2015 Call for Host Proposals

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 16:37

The Code4Lib Community is calling for proposals to host the tenth annual Code4Lib Conference in 2015. Prior to submitting a proposal we recommend reviewing the conference hosting web page and How To Plan a Code4LibCon on the wiki to learn more about the kind of venue the community seeks and the responsibilities involved with hosting the conference.

The deadline for proposals is midnight PST Wednesday March 12th, 2014. The decision will be made by a popular vote. Voting will begin on or around Friday March 14th, 2014 and will continue until midnight PST March 26th, 2014. The results of the vote will be announced Thursday morning at the Code4Lib conference 2014 and emailed out to the listserv.

You can apply by making your pitch to the Code4Lib Conference Planning list at code4libcon@googlegroups.com and linking to your proposal on the 2015 Hosting Proposals wiki page; attention to the criteria listed on the conference hosting page is appreciated. Good luck!

read more

code4lib: Code4Lib 2015 Call for Host Proposals

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 16:37

The Code4Lib Community is calling for proposals to host the tenth annual Code4Lib Conference in 2015. Prior to submitting a proposal we recommend reviewing the conference hosting web page and How To Plan a Code4LibCon on the wiki to learn more about the kind of venue the community seeks and the responsibilities involved with hosting the conference.

The deadline for proposals is midnight PST Wednesday March 12th, 2014. The decision will be made by a popular vote. Voting will begin on or around Friday March 14th, 2014 and will continue until midnight PST March 26th, 2014. The results of the vote will be announced Thursday morning at the Code4Lib conference 2014 and emailed out to the listserv.

You can apply by making your pitch to the Code4Lib Conference Planning list at code4libcon@googlegroups.com and linking to your proposal on the 2015 Hosting Proposals wiki page; attention to the criteria listed on the conference hosting page is appreciated. Good luck!

read more

Scott, Dan: Ups and downs

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 15:00

Tuesday was not the greatest day, but at least each setback resulted in a triumph...

First, the periodical proposal for schema.org--that I have poured a good couple of months of effort into--took a step closer to reality when Dan Brickley announced on the public-vocabs list that he had created a test build that incorporated the RDFS that I had written up. Excitement rapidly turned to horror, though, as I realized that I had made a classic copy/paste error, in which I had changed the displayed name of the domainIncludes value but had not changed the actual URI... Long story short, the test build looked nothing like what the schemabibex group had agreed on, and I was terribly embarrassed.

Luckily, after I fixed the RDFS, Dan was able to put together a revised test build later that day that actually reflected our intentions. So that can continue moving forward...

Second, our Evergreen instance started acting up rather badly. All of the connections to the database server were being gobbled up, and we were scrambling to figure out why. While I'm on sabbatical I'm not really supposed to be involved in the day-to-day operations, but when a core service stops running it's okay for research to wait for a little bit... Eventually I tracked down a fix for a potential denial of service problem (Search result rendering can crush the system) that hadn't been merged into our production system (the fix came out after the start of my sabbatical), and shortly after I put that into production we were back up and running.

Third, after the Evergreen problem was resolved, Bill Dueber pinged me innocently on IRC. He had run into a problem with File_MARC; when serializing MARC as MARC-in-JSON format, fields with a subfield $0 were getting trashed. Data corrupting bugs are one of the most serious classes of bugs for any package maintainer, so I jumped on this problem too... After a little bit of analysis, I figured out that PHP's type coercion for integer-like keys when creating arrays and its json_encode() implementation were combining to ruin the MARC-in-JSON serialization in this one particular case. Faced with rewriting the entire serialization logic, I did what any (in)sane programmer would and ended up running a regex against the result of json_encode() to turn the array-ified subfield $0 back into a key/value pair. File_MARC 1.1.1 is now available at your nearest PEAR mirror...

Scott, Dan: Ups and downs

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 15:00

Tuesday was not the greatest day, but at least each setback resulted in a triumph...

First, the periodical proposal for schema.org--that I have poured a good couple of months of effort into--took a step closer to reality when Dan Brickley announced on the public-vocabs list that he had created a test build that incorporated the RDFS that I had written up. Excitement rapidly turned to horror, though, as I realized that I had made a classic copy/paste error, in which I had changed the displayed name of the domainIncludes value but had not changed the actual URI... Long story short, the test build looked nothing like what the schemabibex group had agreed on, and I was terribly embarrassed.

Luckily, after I fixed the RDFS, Dan was able to put together a revised test build later that day that actually reflected our intentions. So that can continue moving forward...

Second, our Evergreen instance started acting up rather badly. All of the connections to the database server were being gobbled up, and we were scrambling to figure out why. While I'm on sabbatical I'm not really supposed to be involved in the day-to-day operations, but when a core service stops running it's okay for research to wait for a little bit... Eventually I tracked down a fix for a potential denial of service problem (Search result rendering can crush the system) that hadn't been merged into our production system (the fix came out after the start of my sabbatical), and shortly after I put that into production we were back up and running.

Third, after the Evergreen problem was resolved, Bill Dueber pinged me innocently on IRC. He had run into a problem with File_MARC; when serializing MARC as MARC-in-JSON format, fields with a subfield $0 were getting trashed. Data corrupting bugs are one of the most serious classes of bugs for any package maintainer, so I jumped on this problem too... After a little bit of analysis, I figured out that PHP's type coercion for integer-like keys when creating arrays and its json_encode() implementation were combining to ruin the MARC-in-JSON serialization in this one particular case. Faced with rewriting the entire serialization logic, I did what any (in)sane programmer would and ended up running a regex against the result of json_encode() to turn the array-ified subfield $0 back into a key/value pair. File_MARC 1.1.1 is now available at your nearest PEAR mirror...

Rosenthal, David: Amazon's Q4 2013 Results

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 13:56
Jack Clark at The Register estimates that Amazon's cloud computing business put over a billion dollars on the bottom line in Q4 2013. The competition was left in the dust:
This compares with a claim by Microsoft that its Azure cloud wing was a billion-dollar business when measured on an annual basis, and Rackspace's most recent quarterly earnings of $108.4m for its public cloud. Google also operates its own anti-Amazon cloud products via Google App Engine and Google Compute Engine, but doesn't break out revenue in a meaningful format.Of course, much of this profit comes from selling computing rather than storage, but this is further evidence against the idea that "the cloud is cheaper". Cloud services can save money in a situation of spiky demand, but for base-load tasks such as preservation they are uneconomic.

Rosenthal, David: Amazon's Q4 2013 Results

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 13:56
Jack Clark at The Register estimates that Amazon's cloud computing business put over a billion dollars on the bottom line in Q4 2013. The competition was left in the dust:
This compares with a claim by Microsoft that its Azure cloud wing was a billion-dollar business when measured on an annual basis, and Rackspace's most recent quarterly earnings of $108.4m for its public cloud. Google also operates its own anti-Amazon cloud products via Google App Engine and Google Compute Engine, but doesn't break out revenue in a meaningful format.Of course, much of this profit comes from selling computing rather than storage, but this is further evidence against the idea that "the cloud is cheaper". Cloud services can save money in a situation of spiky demand, but for base-load tasks such as preservation they are uneconomic.

Dueber, Bill: Help me test yet another LC Callnumber parser

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 00:00

Those who have followed this blog and my code for a while know that I have a long, slightly sad, and borderline abusive relationship with Library of Congress call numbers.

They're a freakin' nightmare. They just are.

But, based on the premise that Sisyphus was a quitter, I took another stab at it, this time writing a real (PEG-) parser instead of trying to futz with extended regular expressions.

The results, so far, aren't too bad.

The gem is called lc_callnumber, but more importantly, I've put together a little heroku app to let you play with it, and then correct any incorrect parses (or tell me that it worked correctly) to build up a test suite.

So…Please try to break my LC Callnumber parser!

[Code for the app itself is on github; pull requests for both the app and the gem joyously received]

Dueber, Bill: Help me test yet another LC Callnumber parser

planet code4lib - Thu, 2014-01-30 00:00

Those who have followed this blog and my code for a while know that I have a long, slightly sad, and borderline abusive relationship with Library of Congress call numbers.

They're a freakin' nightmare. They just are.

But, based on the premise that Sisyphus was a quitter, I took another stab at it, this time writing a real (PEG-) parser instead of trying to futz with extended regular expressions.

The results, so far, aren't too bad.

The gem is called lc_callnumber, but more importantly, I've put together a little heroku app to let you play with it, and then correct any incorrect parses (or tell me that it worked correctly) to build up a test suite.

So…Please try to break my LC Callnumber parser!

[Code for the app itself is on github; pull requests for both the app and the gem joyously received]

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