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DuraSpace News: AVAILABLE: New Edition of the Digital Preservation Handbook

planet code4lib - Thu, 2016-06-23 00:00

From Neil Beagrie, Charles Beagrie Limited, Digital Preservation Coalition

Glasgow, Scotland  A new edition of the Digital Preservation Handbook was officially launched at the Guildhall in York yesterday, comprehensively updating the original version first published in 2001: http://handbook.dpconline.org/

OCLC Dev Network: Upcoming Changes to WMS Acquisitions API

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 21:00

The WMS Acquisitions API is undergoing backwards incompatible changes in the upcoming July install tentatively scheduled for 7/24/2016.

Brown University Library Digital Technologies Projects: ORCID: Unique IDs for Brown Researchers

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 17:42

The Library is coordinating an effort to introduce ORCID identifiers to the campus. ORCID (orcid.org) is an open, non-profit initiative founded by academic institutions, professional bodies, funding agencies, and publishers to resolve authorship confusion in scholarly work. The ORCID repository of unique scholar identification numbers aims to reliably identify and link scholars in all disciplines with their work, analogous to the way ISBN and DOI identify books and articles.

Brown is an institutional member of ORCID, which allows the University to create ORCID records on behalf of faculty and to integrate ORCID identifiers into the Brown Identity Management System, Researchers@Brown profiles, grant application processes, and other systems that facilitate identification of faculty and their works.

Please go to https://library.brown.edu/orcid to obtain an ORCID identifier OR, if you already have an ORCID, to link it to your Brown identity.

Please contact researchers@brown.edu if you have questions or feedback.

Brown University Library Digital Technologies Projects: ORCID: Unique IDs for Brown Researchers

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 17:42

The Library is coordinating an effort to introduce ORCID identifiers to the campus. ORCID (orcid.org) is an open, non-profit initiative founded by academic institutions, professional bodies, funding agencies, and publishers to resolve authorship confusion in scholarly work. The ORCID repository of unique scholar identification numbers aims to reliably identify and link scholars in all disciplines with their work, analogous to the way ISBN and DOI identify books and articles.

Brown is an institutional member of ORCID, which allows the University to create ORCID records on behalf of faculty and to integrate ORCID identifiers into the Brown Identity Management System, Researchers@Brown profiles, grant application processes, and other systems that facilitate identification of faculty and their works.

Please go to https://library.brown.edu/orcid to obtain an ORCID identifier OR, if you already have an ORCID, to link it to your Brown identity.

Please contact researchers@brown.edu if you have questions or feedback.

Equinox Software: See You In Orlando!

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 16:30

We’re packing up and preparing to head to Orlando for ALA Annual this week!  Equinox will be in Booth 1175. Throughout the conference, you’ll find Mike, Grace, Mary, Galen, Shae, and Dale in the booth ready to answer your questions.  We’d love for you to come visit and do a little crafting with us.  Crafting?  Yes–CRAFTING.  We’ll have some supplies ready for you to make a little DIY swag.  Quantities are limited, so make sure to see us early.

As usual, the Equinox team will be available in the booth to discuss Evergreen, Koha, and FulfILLment.  We’ll also be attending a few programs and, of course, the Evergreen Meet-Up.  Directly following the Evergreen Meet-Up, Equinox is hosting a Happy Hour for the Evergreen aficionados in attendance.  Come chat with us at the Equinox booth to get more information!

The Equinox team is so proud of the proactive approach ALA has taken toward the senseless tragedy in Orlando recently.  We will be participating in some of the relief events.  We will be attending the Pulse Victim’s Memorial on Saturday to pay our respects and you’ll also find some of the team donating blood throughout the weekend.

We’re looking forward to the conference but most of all, we’re looking forward to seeing YOU.  Stop by and say hello at Booth 1175!

Equinox Software: See You In Orlando!

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 16:30

We’re packing up and preparing to head to Orlando for ALA Annual this week!  Equinox will be in Booth 1175. Throughout the conference, you’ll find Mike, Grace, Mary, Galen, Shae, and Dale in the booth ready to answer your questions.  We’d love for you to come visit and do a little crafting with us.  Crafting?  Yes–CRAFTING.  We’ll have some supplies ready for you to make a little DIY swag.  Quantities are limited, so make sure to see us early.

As usual, the Equinox team will be available in the booth to discuss Evergreen, Koha, and FulfILLment.  We’ll also be attending a few programs and, of course, the Evergreen Meet-Up.  Directly following the Evergreen Meet-Up, Equinox is hosting a Happy Hour for the Evergreen aficionados in attendance.  Come chat with us at the Equinox booth to get more information!

The Equinox team is so proud of the proactive approach ALA has taken toward the senseless tragedy in Orlando recently.  We will be participating in some of the relief events.  We will be attending the Pulse Victim’s Memorial on Saturday to pay our respects and you’ll also find some of the team donating blood throughout the weekend.

We’re looking forward to the conference but most of all, we’re looking forward to seeing YOU.  Stop by and say hello at Booth 1175!

Equinox Software: See You In Orlando!

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 16:30

We’re packing up and preparing to head to Orlando for ALA Annual this week!  Equinox will be in Booth 1175. Throughout the conference, you’ll find Mike, Grace, Mary, Galen, Shae, and Dale in the booth ready to answer your questions.  We’d love for you to come visit and do a little crafting with us.  Crafting?  Yes–CRAFTING.  We’ll have some supplies ready for you to make a little DIY swag.  Quantities are limited, so make sure to see us early.

As usual, the Equinox team will be available in the booth to discuss Evergreen, Koha, and FulfILLment.  We’ll also be attending a few programs and, of course, the Evergreen Meet-Up.  Directly following the Evergreen Meet-Up, Equinox is hosting a Happy Hour for the Evergreen aficionados in attendance.  Come chat with us at the Equinox booth to get more information!

The Equinox team is so proud of the proactive approach ALA has taken toward the senseless tragedy in Orlando recently.  We will be participating in some of the relief events.  We will be attending the Pulse Victim’s Memorial on Saturday to pay our respects and you’ll also find some of the team donating blood throughout the weekend.

We’re looking forward to the conference but most of all, we’re looking forward to seeing YOU.  Stop by and say hello at Booth 1175!

Library of Congress: The Signal: Library of Congress Advisory Team Kicks off New Digitization Effort at Eckerd College

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 15:56

Participants in the Eckerd Digitization Advisory meeting include (l-r) Nancy Schuler, Lisa Johnston, Alexis Ramsey-Tobienne, Alyssa Koclanes, Mary Molinaro (Digital Preservation Network) George Coulbourne (Library of Congress), David Gliem, Arthur Skinner, Justine Sanford, Emily Ayers-Rideout, Nicole Finzer (Northwestern University), Kristen Regina (Philadelphia Museum of Art), Anna Ruth, and Brittney Sherley.

This is a guest post by Eckerd College faculty David Gliem, associate professor of Art History, and Nancy Schuler, librarian and asistant professor of Electronic Resources, Collection Development and Instructional Services.

On June 3rd, a meeting at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida, brought key experts and College departments together to begin plans for the digitization of the College’s art collection. George Coulbourne of the Library of Congress assembled a team of advisers that included DPOE trainers and NDSR program providers from the Library of Congress, Northwestern University, the Digital Preservation Network, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University.

Advisers provided guidance on project elements including institutional repositories, collection design, metadata and cataloging standards, funding and partnership opportunities and digitization strategies. Suggestions will be used to design a digitization and preservation strategy that could be used as a model for small academic institutions.

Eckerd College is an innovative undergraduate liberal arts institution known for its small classes and values-oriented curriculum that stresses personal and social responsibility, cross-cultural understanding and respect for diversity in a global society. A charter member of Loren Pope’s 40 Colleges That Change Lives, Eckerd has a unique approach to mentoring that reflects its commitment to students. As a tuition-dependent institution of 1,770 students, Eckerd is seeking ways to design the project to be cost-effective, while also ensuring long-term sustainability.

The initial goal of the project is to digitize the College’s large collection of more than 3000 prints, paintings, drawings and sculptures made by the founding faculty in the visual arts: Robert O. Hodgell (1922-2000), Jim Crane (1927-2015) and Margaret (Pegg) Rigg (1928-2011). Along with Crane (cartoonist, painter and collage artist) and Rigg (art editor of motive (always spelled with a lowercase “m”) magazine, as well as graphic designer, assemblage artist and calligrapher), Hodgell (printmaker, painter, sculptor, and illustrator) contributed regularly to motive, a progressive monthly magazine published by the Methodist Student Movement.

In print from 1941 to 1972, motive was hailed for its vanguard editorial and artistic vision and for its aggressive stance on civil rights, Vietnam, and gender issues. In 1965 the publication was runner-up to Life for Magazine of the Year and in 1966, Time magazine quipped that among church publications it stood out “like a miniskirt at a church social.” An entire generation of activists was shaped by its vision with Hodgell, Crane and Rigg playing an important role in forming and communicating that vision.

Eckerd’s unique position as a liberal arts college influenced by the tenants of the Presbyterian Church made it possible for these artists to converge and produce art that reflected society and promoted the emergence of activism that shaped the identity of the Methodist church at the time. Preserving these materials and making them available for broader scholarship will provide significant insight into the factors surrounding the development of the Methodist Church as it is today. Implementing the infrastructure to preserve, digitize and house the collection provides additional opportunities to add other College collections to the repository in the future.

The gathering also brought together relevant departments within Eckerd College, including representatives from the Library, Visual Arts and Rhetoric faculty, Information Technology Services, Marketing & Communications, Advancement and the Dean of Faculty. Having these key players in the room provided an opportunity to involve the broader campus community so efforts can begin to ensure the long-term sustainability of the project, while also highlighting key challenges unique to the College as seen by the external board of advisors.

Eckerd will now move forward with grant applications for the project, with hopes to integrate DPOE’s Train-the-trainer and an NDSR program to jump start and sustain the project through implementation. Potential partnerships and training opportunities with area institutions and local groups will be explored, as well as teaching opportunities to educate students about the importance of digital stewardship.

Library of Congress: The Signal: Library of Congress Advisory Team Kicks off New Digitization Effort at Eckerd College

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 15:56

Participants in the Eckerd Digitization Advisory meeting include (l-r) Nancy Schuler, Lisa Johnston, Alexis Ramsey-Tobienne, Alyssa Koclanes, Mary Molinaro (Digital Preservation Network) George Coulbourne (Library of Congress), David Gliem, Arthur Skinner, Justine Sanford, Emily Ayers-Rideout, Nicole Finzer (Northwestern University), Kristen Regina (Philadelphia Museum of Art), Anna Ruth, and Brittney Sherley.

This is a guest post by Eckerd College faculty David Gliem, associate professor of Art History, and Nancy Schuler, librarian and asistant professor of Electronic Resources, Collection Development and Instructional Services.

On June 3rd, a meeting at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida, brought key experts and College departments together to begin plans for the digitization of the College’s art collection. George Coulbourne of the Library of Congress assembled a team of advisers that included DPOE trainers and NDSR program providers from the Library of Congress, Northwestern University, the Digital Preservation Network, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University.

Advisers provided guidance on project elements including institutional repositories, collection design, metadata and cataloging standards, funding and partnership opportunities and digitization strategies. Suggestions will be used to design a digitization and preservation strategy that could be used as a model for small academic institutions.

Eckerd College is an innovative undergraduate liberal arts institution known for its small classes and values-oriented curriculum that stresses personal and social responsibility, cross-cultural understanding and respect for diversity in a global society. A charter member of Loren Pope’s 40 Colleges That Change Lives, Eckerd has a unique approach to mentoring that reflects its commitment to students. As a tuition-dependent institution of 1,770 students, Eckerd is seeking ways to design the project to be cost-effective, while also ensuring long-term sustainability.

The initial goal of the project is to digitize the College’s large collection of more than 3000 prints, paintings, drawings and sculptures made by the founding faculty in the visual arts: Robert O. Hodgell (1922-2000), Jim Crane (1927-2015) and Margaret (Pegg) Rigg (1928-2011). Along with Crane (cartoonist, painter and collage artist) and Rigg (art editor of motive (always spelled with a lowercase “m”) magazine, as well as graphic designer, assemblage artist and calligrapher), Hodgell (printmaker, painter, sculptor, and illustrator) contributed regularly to motive, a progressive monthly magazine published by the Methodist Student Movement.

In print from 1941 to 1972, motive was hailed for its vanguard editorial and artistic vision and for its aggressive stance on civil rights, Vietnam, and gender issues. In 1965 the publication was runner-up to Life for Magazine of the Year and in 1966, Time magazine quipped that among church publications it stood out “like a miniskirt at a church social.” An entire generation of activists was shaped by its vision with Hodgell, Crane and Rigg playing an important role in forming and communicating that vision.

Eckerd’s unique position as a liberal arts college influenced by the tenants of the Presbyterian Church made it possible for these artists to converge and produce art that reflected society and promoted the emergence of activism that shaped the identity of the Methodist church at the time. Preserving these materials and making them available for broader scholarship will provide significant insight into the factors surrounding the development of the Methodist Church as it is today. Implementing the infrastructure to preserve, digitize and house the collection provides additional opportunities to add other College collections to the repository in the future.

The gathering also brought together relevant departments within Eckerd College, including representatives from the Library, Visual Arts and Rhetoric faculty, Information Technology Services, Marketing & Communications, Advancement and the Dean of Faculty. Having these key players in the room provided an opportunity to involve the broader campus community so efforts can begin to ensure the long-term sustainability of the project, while also highlighting key challenges unique to the College as seen by the external board of advisors.

Eckerd will now move forward with grant applications for the project, with hopes to integrate DPOE’s Train-the-trainer and an NDSR program to jump start and sustain the project through implementation. Potential partnerships and training opportunities with area institutions and local groups will be explored, as well as teaching opportunities to educate students about the importance of digital stewardship.

Roy Tennant: The Rise of Bad Infographics

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 14:38

Given the ubiquity of infographics on the web today (according to one account they have increased 1200% in three years), you can be forgiven for thinking that they are a new phenomenon. They aren’t. Infographics have actually been around for quite some time, as Edward Tufte pointed out with his popularization of one of the best infographics of all time (see pic and link): Charles Joseph Minard’s portrayal of the losses suffered by Napoleon’s army in the Russian campaign of 1812.

Go ahead and take a look. Study it. I’ll be here when you get back. 

Do you see what he did? He took raw data and made it communicate visually. Let me re-iterate this, as this lesson is too often lost in present day “infographics”. You receive information immediately, without reading it. The minute you understand that the width of the line equals the relative number of troops, you are stunned. The depth of the tragedy has been communicated — if not fully, at least by impression.

The Menard infographic also combines several different planes of information, from troop strength, to temperature, to distance. It is, frankly, brilliant. I’m not suggesting that every library infographic needs to be brilliant, but nearly all of them can be smarter than they are. Either that, or give up the attempt. Seriously.

It’s sad, but many contemporary infographics are hardly anything more than numbers and clip art — often with only a tenuous connection between them. We really must do better.

Minard’s early infographic ably demonstrates the best qualities of an infographic presentation:

  • Information is conveyed at a glance. If you must read a lot of text to get the drift of the message, then you are failing.
  • The whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Menard deftly uses all of the dimensions of a piece of paper to convey distance, temperature, and troop strength all in one graphic. The combination puts across a message that any single element could not.
  • There are layers of information that are well integrated in the whole. An initial impression can be conveyed, but your graphic should also reveal more information under scrutiny.

Unfortunately, library infographics rarely, if ever, even loosely achieve these aims. Humor me, and do a Google Images search on “library infographics” and see what you get. Mostly they are simply numbers that are “illustrated” by some icon or image. They really aren’t infographics of the variety that Tufte champions. They are, unfortunately, mostly pale shadows of what is possible.

So let’s review some of the signs of a bad infographic:

  • Numbers are the most prominent thing you see. If you look at an infographic and it’s only numbers that leap out at you, stop wasting your time. Move on.
  • The numbers are not related at all. Many library infographics combine numbers that have no relation to each other. Who wants to puzzle out the significance of the number “30” next to the number “300,000”? Not me, nor anyone else.
  • The images are only loosely connected to the numbers. Stop putting an icon of a book next to the number of book checkouts. Just stop.

In the end, it’s clear that libraries really need professional help. Don’t think that you can simply take numbers, add an icon, and create a meaningful infographic. You can’t. It’s stupid. Just stop. If we can’t do this right, then we shouldn’t be doing it at all.

Roy Tennant: The Rise of Bad Infographics

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 14:38

Given the ubiquity of infographics on the web today (according to one account they have increased 1200% in three years), you can be forgiven for thinking that they are a new phenomenon. They aren’t. Infographics have actually been around for quite some time, as Edward Tufte pointed out with his popularization of one of the best infographics of all time (see pic and link): Charles Joseph Minard’s portrayal of the losses suffered by Napoleon’s army in the Russian campaign of 1812.

Go ahead and take a look. Study it. I’ll be here when you get back. 

Do you see what he did? He took raw data and made it communicate visually. Let me re-iterate this, as this lesson is too often lost in present day “infographics”. You receive information immediately, without reading it. The minute you understand that the width of the line equals the relative number of troops, you are stunned. The depth of the tragedy has been communicated — if not fully, at least by impression.

The Menard infographic also combines several different planes of information, from troop strength, to temperature, to distance. It is, frankly, brilliant. I’m not suggesting that every library infographic needs to be brilliant, but nearly all of them can be smarter than they are. Either that, or give up the attempt. Seriously.

It’s sad, but many contemporary infographics are hardly anything more than numbers and clip art — often with only a tenuous connection between them. We really must do better.

Minard’s early infographic ably demonstrates the best qualities of an infographic presentation:

  • Information is conveyed at a glance. If you must read a lot of text to get the drift of the message, then you are failing.
  • The whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Menard deftly uses all of the dimensions of a piece of paper to convey distance, temperature, and troop strength all in one graphic. The combination puts across a message that any single element could not.
  • There are layers of information that are well integrated in the whole. An initial impression can be conveyed, but your graphic should also reveal more information under scrutiny.

Unfortunately, library infographics rarely, if ever, even loosely achieve these aims. Humor me, and do a Google Images search on “library infographics” and see what you get. Mostly they are simply numbers that are “illustrated” by some icon or image. They really aren’t infographics of the variety that Tufte champions. They are, unfortunately, mostly pale shadows of what is possible.

So let’s review some of the signs of a bad infographic:

  • Numbers are the most prominent thing you see. If you look at an infographic and it’s only numbers that leap out at you, stop wasting your time. Move on.
  • The numbers are not related at all. Many library infographics combine numbers that have no relation to each other. Who wants to puzzle out the significance of the number “30” next to the number “300,000”? Not me, nor anyone else.
  • The images are only loosely connected to the numbers. Stop putting an icon of a book next to the number of book checkouts. Just stop.

In the end, it’s clear that libraries really need professional help. Don’t think that you can simply take numbers, add an icon, and create a meaningful infographic. You can’t. It’s stupid. Just stop. If we can’t do this right, then we shouldn’t be doing it at all.

Roy Tennant: The Rise of Bad Infographics

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 14:38

Given the ubiquity of infographics on the web today (according to one account they have increased 1200% in three years), you can be forgiven for thinking that they are a new phenomenon. They aren’t. Infographics have actually been around for quite some time, as Edward Tufte pointed out with his popularization of one of the best infographics of all time (see pic and link): Charles Joseph Minard’s portrayal of the losses suffered by Napoleon’s army in the Russian campaign of 1812.

Go ahead and take a look. Study it. I’ll be here when you get back. 

Do you see what he did? He took raw data and made it communicate visually. Let me re-iterate this, as this lesson is too often lost in present day “infographics”. You receive information immediately, without reading it. The minute you understand that the width of the line equals the relative number of troops, you are stunned. The depth of the tragedy has been communicated — if not fully, at least by impression.

The Menard infographic also combines several different planes of information, from troop strength, to temperature, to distance. It is, frankly, brilliant. I’m not suggesting that every library infographic needs to be brilliant, but nearly all of them can be smarter than they are. Either that, or give up the attempt. Seriously.

It’s sad, but many contemporary infographics are hardly anything more than numbers and clip art — often with only a tenuous connection between them. We really must do better.

Minard’s early infographic ably demonstrates the best qualities of an infographic presentation:

  • Information is conveyed at a glance. If you must read a lot of text to get the drift of the message, then you are failing.
  • The whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Menard deftly uses all of the dimensions of a piece of paper to convey distance, temperature, and troop strength all in one graphic. The combination puts across a message that any single element could not.
  • There are layers of information that are well integrated in the whole. An initial impression can be conveyed, but your graphic should also reveal more information under scrutiny.

Unfortunately, library infographics rarely, if ever, even loosely achieve these aims. Humor me, and do a Google Images search on “library infographics” and see what you get. Mostly they are simply numbers that are “illustrated” by some icon or image. They really aren’t infographics of the variety that Tufte champions. They are, unfortunately, mostly pale shadows of what is possible.

So let’s review some of the signs of a bad infographic:

  • Numbers are the most prominent thing you see. If you look at an infographic and it’s only numbers that leap out at you, stop wasting your time. Move on.
  • The numbers are not related at all. Many library infographics combine numbers that have no relation to each other. Who wants to puzzle out the significance of the number “30” next to the number “300,000”? Not me, nor anyone else.
  • The images are only loosely connected to the numbers. Stop putting an icon of a book next to the number of book checkouts. Just stop.

In the end, it’s clear that libraries really need professional help. Don’t think that you can simply take numbers, add an icon, and create a meaningful infographic. You can’t. It’s stupid. Just stop. If we can’t do this right, then we shouldn’t be doing it at all.

DPLA: DPLA and FamilySearch Partner to Expand Access to Digitized Historical Books Online

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 12:00

BOSTON/SALT LAKE CITY— In concert with the American Library Association national conference in Orlando, Florida, this week, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) and FamilySearch International, the largest genealogy organization in the world, have signed an agreement that will expand
access to FamilySearch.org’s growing free digital historical book collection to DPLA’s broad audience of users including genealogists, researchers, family historians, students, and more.

Family history/genealogy continues to be a popular and growing hobby. And FamilySearch is a leader in the use of technology to digitally preserve the world’s historic records and books of genealogical relevance for easy search and access online. With this new partnership, DPLA will incorporate metadata from FamilySearch.org’s online digital book collection that will make more than 200,000 family history books discoverable through DPLA’s search portal later this year. From DPLA, users will be able to access the free, fully viewable digital books on FamilySearch.org.  

The digitized historical book collection at FamilySearch.org includes genealogy and family history publications from the archives of some of the most important family history libraries in the world. The collection includes family histories, county and local histories, genealogy magazines and how-to books, gazetteers, and medieval histories and pedigrees.  Tens of thousands of new publications are added yearly.

“We’re excited to see information about FamilySearch’s vast holdings more broadly circulated to those trained to collect, catalog, and distribute useful information. Joint initiatives like this with DPLA help us to further expand access to the rich historic records hidden in libraries and archives worldwide to more curious online patrons,” said David Rencher, FamilySearch’s Chief Genealogy Officer.

Dan Cohen, Executive Director of DPLA, sees the addition of FamilySearch’s digital book collection as part of DPLA’s ongoing mission to be an essential site for family history researchers: “At DPLA, we aspire to collect and share cultural heritage materials that represent individuals, families, and communities from all walks of life across the country, past and present. The FamilySearch collection and our continued engagement with genealogists and family researchers is critical to help bring the stories represented in these treasured resources to life in powerful and exciting ways.”

FamilySearch is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to the discovery and preservation of personal and family histories and stories, introducing individuals to their ancestors through the widespread access to records, and collaborating with others who share this vision. Within DPLA, FamilySearch’s book collection will be discoverable alongside over 13 million cultural heritage materials contributed by DPLA’s growing network of over 2,000 libraries, archives, and museums across the country, opening up all new possibilities for discovery for users and researchers worldwide.  

Find more about FamilySearch or search its resources online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about Digital Public Library of America at https://dp.la.  

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

About the Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America strives to contain the full breadth of human expression, from the written word, to works of art and culture, to records of America’s heritage, to the efforts and data of science. Since launching in April 2013, it has aggregated more than 13 million items from 2,000 institutions. The DPLA is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit.

Media Contacts

DPLA: info@dp.la
FamilySearch: news@familysearch.org

DPLA: DPLA and FamilySearch Partner to Expand Access to Digitized Historical Books Online

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 12:00

BOSTON/SALT LAKE CITY— In concert with the American Library Association national conference in Orlando, Florida, this week, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) and FamilySearch International, the largest genealogy organization in the world, have signed an agreement that will expand
access to FamilySearch.org’s growing free digital historical book collection to DPLA’s broad audience of users including genealogists, researchers, family historians, students, and more.

Family history/genealogy continues to be a popular and growing hobby. And FamilySearch is a leader in the use of technology to digitally preserve the world’s historic records and books of genealogical relevance for easy search and access online. With this new partnership, DPLA will incorporate metadata from FamilySearch.org’s online digital book collection that will make more than 200,000 family history books discoverable through DPLA’s search portal later this year. From DPLA, users will be able to access the free, fully viewable digital books on FamilySearch.org.  

The digitized historical book collection at FamilySearch.org includes genealogy and family history publications from the archives of some of the most important family history libraries in the world. The collection includes family histories, county and local histories, genealogy magazines and how-to books, gazetteers, and medieval histories and pedigrees.  Tens of thousands of new publications are added yearly.

“We’re excited to see information about FamilySearch’s vast holdings more broadly circulated to those trained to collect, catalog, and distribute useful information. Joint initiatives like this with DPLA help us to further expand access to the rich historic records hidden in libraries and archives worldwide to more curious online patrons,” said David Rencher, FamilySearch’s Chief Genealogy Officer.

Dan Cohen, Executive Director of DPLA, sees the addition of FamilySearch’s digital book collection as part of DPLA’s ongoing mission to be an essential site for family history researchers: “At DPLA, we aspire to collect and share cultural heritage materials that represent individuals, families, and communities from all walks of life across the country, past and present. The FamilySearch collection and our continued engagement with genealogists and family researchers is critical to help bring the stories represented in these treasured resources to life in powerful and exciting ways.”

FamilySearch is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to the discovery and preservation of personal and family histories and stories, introducing individuals to their ancestors through the widespread access to records, and collaborating with others who share this vision. Within DPLA, FamilySearch’s book collection will be discoverable alongside over 13 million cultural heritage materials contributed by DPLA’s growing network of over 2,000 libraries, archives, and museums across the country, opening up all new possibilities for discovery for users and researchers worldwide.  

Find more about FamilySearch or search its resources online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about Digital Public Library of America at https://dp.la.  

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

About the Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America strives to contain the full breadth of human expression, from the written word, to works of art and culture, to records of America’s heritage, to the efforts and data of science. Since launching in April 2013, it has aggregated more than 13 million items from 2,000 institutions. The DPLA is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit.

Media Contacts

DPLA: info@dp.la
FamilySearch: news@familysearch.org

DPLA: DPLA and FamilySearch Partner to Expand Access to Digitized Historical Books Online

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 12:00

BOSTON/SALT LAKE CITY— In concert with the American Library Association national conference in Orlando, Florida, this week, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) and FamilySearch International, the largest genealogy organization in the world, have signed an agreement that will expand
access to FamilySearch.org’s growing free digital historical book collection to DPLA’s broad audience of users including genealogists, researchers, family historians, students, and more.

Family history/genealogy continues to be a popular and growing hobby. And FamilySearch is a leader in the use of technology to digitally preserve the world’s historic records and books of genealogical relevance for easy search and access online. With this new partnership, DPLA will incorporate metadata from FamilySearch.org’s online digital book collection that will make more than 200,000 family history books discoverable through DPLA’s search portal later this year. From DPLA, users will be able to access the free, fully viewable digital books on FamilySearch.org.  

The digitized historical book collection at FamilySearch.org includes genealogy and family history publications from the archives of some of the most important family history libraries in the world. The collection includes family histories, county and local histories, genealogy magazines and how-to books, gazetteers, and medieval histories and pedigrees.  Tens of thousands of new publications are added yearly.

“We’re excited to see information about FamilySearch’s vast holdings more broadly circulated to those trained to collect, catalog, and distribute useful information. Joint initiatives like this with DPLA help us to further expand access to the rich historic records hidden in libraries and archives worldwide to more curious online patrons,” said David Rencher, FamilySearch’s Chief Genealogy Officer.

Dan Cohen, Executive Director of DPLA, sees the addition of FamilySearch’s digital book collection as part of DPLA’s ongoing mission to be an essential site for family history researchers: “At DPLA, we aspire to collect and share cultural heritage materials that represent individuals, families, and communities from all walks of life across the country, past and present. The FamilySearch collection and our continued engagement with genealogists and family researchers is critical to help bring the stories represented in these treasured resources to life in powerful and exciting ways.”

FamilySearch is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to the discovery and preservation of personal and family histories and stories, introducing individuals to their ancestors through the widespread access to records, and collaborating with others who share this vision. Within DPLA, FamilySearch’s book collection will be discoverable alongside over 13 million cultural heritage materials contributed by DPLA’s growing network of over 2,000 libraries, archives, and museums across the country, opening up all new possibilities for discovery for users and researchers worldwide.  

Find more about FamilySearch or search its resources online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about Digital Public Library of America at https://dp.la.  

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

About the Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America strives to contain the full breadth of human expression, from the written word, to works of art and culture, to records of America’s heritage, to the efforts and data of science. Since launching in April 2013, it has aggregated more than 13 million items from 2,000 institutions. The DPLA is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit.

Media Contacts

DPLA: info@dp.la
FamilySearch: news@familysearch.org

Hydra Project: Lafayette College becomes Hydra’s 100000th Partner

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 08:43

We are delighted to announce that Lafayette College has become Hydra’s 100000th formal Partner.  But only if you count in binary – otherwise, they’re our 32nd!

Although Lafayette is a “small liberal arts school” (their words), they have been involved with digital repository development for almost a decade and with Fedora since 2013.  They write: “We have now spent over two years working with Hydra, getting to know the community and learning the Hydra way.  We are firmly committed to this trajectory and wish now to become more involved, both technically and through project governance.  We believe that a strengthened commitment would be of mutual benefit and, moreover, would serve as a compelling example for other liberal arts colleges that we are seeking to interest in shared Open Source development.”

Welcome Lafayette!  We look forward to working with you.

Hydra Project: Lafayette College becomes Hydra’s 100000th Partner

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 08:43

We are delighted to announce that Lafayette College has become Hydra’s 100000th formal Partner.  But only if you count in binary – otherwise, they’re our 32nd!

Although Lafayette is a “small liberal arts school” (their words), they have been involved with digital repository development for almost a decade and with Fedora since 2013.  They write: “We have now spent over two years working with Hydra, getting to know the community and learning the Hydra way.  We are firmly committed to this trajectory and wish now to become more involved, both technically and through project governance.  We believe that a strengthened commitment would be of mutual benefit and, moreover, would serve as a compelling example for other liberal arts colleges that we are seeking to interest in shared Open Source development.”

Welcome Lafayette!  We look forward to working with you.

Hydra Project: Lafayette College becomes Hydra’s 100000th Partner

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 08:43

We are delighted to announce that Lafayette College has become Hydra’s 100000th formal Partner.  But only if you count in binary – otherwise, they’re our 32nd!

Although Lafayette is a “small liberal arts school” (their words), they have been involved with digital repository development for almost a decade and with Fedora since 2013.  They write: “We have now spent over two years working with Hydra, getting to know the community and learning the Hydra way.  We are firmly committed to this trajectory and wish now to become more involved, both technically and through project governance.  We believe that a strengthened commitment would be of mutual benefit and, moreover, would serve as a compelling example for other liberal arts colleges that we are seeking to interest in shared Open Source development.”

Welcome Lafayette!  We look forward to working with you.

Library Tech Talk (U of Michigan): New Computer refresh cycle tool for the Library

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-06-22 00:00

The University of Michigan Library replaces roughly 1/4 of our computers every year. It is a long and complicated process when one considers the number of library staff and the number of computers (both in office and public areas where staff machines are used) involved. This year we use a locally developed tool to streamline the process.

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