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Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part db

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 19:26

Part db of Amazon crawl..

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Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part eh

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 19:23

Part eh of Amazon crawl..

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Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part ed

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 19:15

Part ed of Amazon crawl..

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Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part eb

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 19:10

Part eb of Amazon crawl..

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Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part dt

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 19:06

Part dt of Amazon crawl..

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This item has files of the following types: Data, Archive BitTorrent, Data, Metadata, Text

HangingTogether: Addressing the challenges with organizational identifiers and ISNI

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 19:05

OCLC has just published the report from the 14-member OCLC Research task group on Representing Organizations in ISNI: Addressing the Challenges with Organizational Identifiers and ISNI.* This work originated from discussions with OCLC Research Library Partners on a previous effort by another OCLC Research Library Partners task group on researcher identifiers, Registering Researchers in Authority Files, published in 2014.  That report noted that a key attribute distinguishing researchers with identical names is to accurately associate them with their institutional affiliations.

A variety of stakeholders need to identify organizations accurately and define relationships among their sub-units and with other organizations. Academic institutions want to aggregate their researchers’ output as comprehensively as possible, as such aggregations affect their reputations which in turn can influence their success in obtaining funding and attracting or retaining faculty. Organizational identifiers provide the means to do that.  The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI), with a database that already includes over 500,000 institutional identifiers derived from registries of agencies with business needs for identifying institutions, can be used to disambiguate organizations.

OCLC Research Library Partner metadata managers questioned how their institutions were represented in the ISNI database, which led to forming the task group.  The report documents:

  • The special challenges represented by organizations
  • New modeling of organizations that others can adapt for their own uses
  • Twelve use-cases and scenarios
  • Examples of how ISNI can meet the needs identified by the twelve use cases
  • 23 recommendations for improving ISNI
  • Issues for which there are no easy or immediate answers

The report also includes an outreach document targeted to academic administrators presenting the reasons why organizational identifiers are important and the benefits of ISNI membership.

The report will be of interest to academic administrators eager to more accurately aggregate the scholarly output of their institutions; to linked data implementers who need to represent relationships between and among organizational entities; and to all librarians who have had to associate a work’s creator with an institutional affiliation.

Five of the task group members will be presenting highlights from this report on 9 May 2016 in a free webinar open to all interested (register here). We welcome your feedback—post comments to this blog entry or tweet your questions or comments using the hashtag #orgidreport.

* Full citation: Smith-Yoshimura, Karen, Janifer Gatenby, Grace Agnew, Christopher Brown, Kate Byrne, Matt Carruthers, Peter Fletcher, Stephen Hearn, Xiaoli Li, Marina Muilwijk, Chew Chiat Naun, John Riemer, Roderick Sadler, Jing Wang, Glen Wiley, and Kayla Willey. 2016. Addressing the Challenges with Organizational Identifiers and ISNI. Dublin, Ohio: OCLC Research. http://www.oclc.org/content/dam/research/publications/2016/oclcresearch-organizational-identifiers-and-isni-2016.pdf.

 

About Karen Smith-Yoshimura

Karen Smith-Yoshimura, senior program officer, works on topics related to creating and managing metadata with a focus on large research libraries and multilingual requirements.

Mail | Web | Twitter | More Posts (67)

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part dy

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 19:01

Part dy of Amazon crawl..

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District Dispatch: Libraries need to Grow2Gig+

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 19:00

SHLB Director John Windhausen (upper far right), SHLB members and allies launch the #Grow2Gig campaign.

As many of you know, the ALA is a founding member of the Schools, Health and Libraries Broadband (SHLB) Coalition, which was created in 2009 to advocate for community anchor institutions as part of the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program. I also am proud to serve on the SHLB board of directors and to share the new “Connecting Anchor Institutions: A Vision of our Future” report and Grow2Gig+ campaign.

While public library broadband speeds have steadily improved over the last five years, less than 5 percent of libraries have yet reached the 2020 gigabit goal outlined for community anchor institutions in the National Broadband Plan. With growth in digital media labs that enable creation and sharing of content, video teleconferencing that collapse geographical distances, and the proliferation of mobile devices streaming more and more digital content from our virtual shelves, libraries need to Grow2Gig+.

The new vision paper includes a section dedicated to library broadband that features insights from ALA President Sari Feldman, Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) Executive Director Dan Cohen and Bibliotech author John Palfrey (among others) talking about emerging roles and demands to meet the library mission and community needs.

“Libraries are transforming into community hubs for digital content creation and collaboration,” Feldman said. “Having a high-speed and resilient Internet connection at each and every library is essential to ensuring a full range of services related to education, employment, entrepreneurship, empowerment and community engagement for all.”

Importantly, this paper is only the first of many that will make up a broadband action plan for connecting community anchor institutions. Ten papers will follow that make recommendations for federal, state, and local policy changes on issues ranging from wireless networking to broadband funding to digital equity.

Ensuring and leveraging affordable, high-capacity broadband connections for libraries and our communities is central to meeting the ALA and library mission of advancing access to online information and resources for everyone. A commitment to digital equity and opportunity drives our advocacy on E-rate, Lifeline, network neutrality and the need for unlicensed spectrum – as well as the larger Policy Revolution! initiative.

SHLB’s new #Gig2Grow campaign and “Connecting Anchor Institutions: A Broadband Action Plan” provide new and needed resources to make the case for the robust broadband capacity needed to best serve our communities. The ALA will use these documents as a foundation for our work preparing for the upcoming Presidential transition, and we look forward to our continued collaboration with SHLB and its diverse members around the nation to achieve our common goals and vision.

The post Libraries need to Grow2Gig+ appeared first on District Dispatch.

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part ef

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 18:57

Part ef of Amazon crawl..

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This item has files of the following types: Data, Archive BitTorrent, Data, Metadata, Text

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part dq

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 18:53

Part dq of Amazon crawl..

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Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part co

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 18:49

Part co of Amazon crawl..

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Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part dw

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 18:45

Part dw of Amazon crawl..

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District Dispatch: National Small Business Week is upon us

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 18:42

National Small Business Week: May 1-7, 2016. Image from Joe the Goat Farmer, via Flickr.

This first week of May 2016 marks the 53rd annual National Small Business Week. When President Kennedy recognized the first National Small Business Week, the entrepreneurship ecosystem hadn’t yet been animated by digital “making” equipment or the worldwide web, but it was then and is today the beating heart of our national economy. Small businesses make up 99.7 percent of all U.S. businesses and employ 48 percent of U.S. employees, according to the Small Business Administration.

Every beating heart needs lifeblood to drive its cadence – and no network of institutions represents richer lifeblood for America’s vast cohort of innovators and small business owners than the library community.

Last year, in recognition of National Start-Up Day Across America, I wrote about various ways in which libraries propel entrepreneurship. I highlighted the growth of co-working areas – dedicated space for conducting day-to-day business – within libraries, and described how MapStory, an interactive platform for mapping change over time, has used D.C. Public Library’s co-working space to grow and make community connections. I also highlighted the business plan assistance and prototyping equipment – i.e. 3D printers, laser cutters and computer numerical control (CNC) routers – libraries make available to innovators looking to bring an idea for a new product to fruition.

Since then, I’ve done a lot more research on the role libraries play in assisting entrepreneurs. It’s been fun and inspiring work. Among my many discoveries, I’ve learned that libraries provide copious amounts of information on patent and trademark issues through a network of libraries known as Patent and Trademark Resource Centers. I’ve also learned about library production facilities – like Chicago Public Library’s YouMedia Lab – that prepare young people for careers as arts and engineering entrepreneurs. More than 5,000 public libraries provide small business development programs and resources, according to the Digital Inclusion Survey.

I assume that this information is not new to many District Dispatch readers. If you’re a working library professional, you probably know that libraries play an important role in the innovation economy. However, this post is meant to serve not as an exposition of facts, but as a call to action.

Given all libraries do to support entrepreneurs, we must seek opportunities to work with other actors in the entrepreneurship ecosystem to create stronger opportunities for all innovators – including those who lack the basic resources necessary to convert an idea into a venture. Libraries are ubiquitous; they have a footprint in low-income and rural areas that are generally underserved by other business incubators and accelerators. The library community must increase awareness of the role we play as a natural starting point for innovators and seek opportunities to bolster the assistance we offer through partnerships with government agencies, non-profits and private firms.

In short, during this Small Business Week, library professionals should celebrate our contributions to the entrepreneurship ecosystem, but also realize the potential of our community to do a great deal more to advance this ecosystem through effective advocacy and relationship building. Sharing what your library offers with the #DreamSmallBiz hashtag this week is one way to join the online conversation, and we invite you to share a new video featuring small business owner John Fuduric.

ALA is already working to put libraries on the radar of leaders in the entrepreneurship space through engagement with government officials and small business leaders. You can read about a panel of entrepreneurship experts that OITP Deputy Director Larra Clark recently moderated at ALA’s first-ever National Policy Convening here.

The post National Small Business Week is upon us appeared first on District Dispatch.

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part dh

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 18:41

Part dh of Amazon crawl..

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This item has files of the following types: Data, Archive BitTorrent, Data, Metadata, Text

LITA: Learn the latest on Privacy Tools

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 18:39

Privacy tools are a hot topic in libraries, as librarians all over the country have begun using and teaching privacy-enhancing technologies, and considering the privacy and security implications of library websites, databases, and services. Attend the LITA up to the minute privacy concerns webinars and pre-conference featuring experts in the field on these important and timely topics.

Here’s the line up:

Here’s the details:

Email is a postcard: how to make it more secure with free software and encryption.
Thursday May 26, 2016, webinar, 1:00 – 2:00 pm Central Time
Alison Macrina, Director of the Library Freedom Project
Nima Fatemi, Chief Technologist of Library Freedom Project

Email is neither secure nor private, and the process of fixing its problems can be mystifying, even for technical folks. In this one hour webinar, Nima and Alison from Library Freedom Project will help shine some light on email issues and the tools you can use to make this communication more confidential. They will cover the issues with email, and teach about how to use GPG to encrypt emails and keep them safe.

TOR onion

Tor-ify Your Library: How to use this privacy-enhancing technology to keep your patrons’ data safe
Tuesday May 31, 2016, webinar, 1:00 – 2:00 pm Central Time
Alison Macrina, Director of the Library Freedom Project
Nima Fatemi, Chief Technologist of Library Freedom Project

Heard about the Tor network but not sure how it applies to your library? Join Alison and Nima from the Library Freedom Project in this one hour webinar to learn about the Tor network, running the Tor browser and a Relay, and other basic services to help your patrons have enhanced browsing privacy in the library and beyond.

Alison Macrina Nima Fatemi

Alison’s and Nima’s work for the Library Freedom Project and classes for patrons including tips on teaching patron privacy classes can be found at: https://libraryfreedomproject.org/resources/onlineprivacybasics/

Register now for either webinar. The two webinars are being offered as either single sessions or as a series of two webinars.

Costs:

  • LITA Member: $45
  • Non-Member: $105
  • Group: $196

To register for both webinars at a discounted rate use the “Webinar Series: Email Is a Postcard & Tor-ify Your Library” register link.

The discounted rates for both sessions:

  • LITA Member: $68
  • Non-Member: $155
  • Group: $300

Digital Privacy and Security: Keeping You And Your Library Safe and Secure In A Post-Snowden World.
Friday June 24, 2016, LITA ALA Annual pre-conference, 1:00 – 4:00 pm
Jessamyn West, Library Technologist at Open Library
Blake Carver, LYRASIS 

Jessamyn West Blake Carver

Learn strategies on how to make you, your librarians and your patrons more secure & private in a world of ubiquitous digital surveillance and criminal hacking. Jessamyn and Blake will teach tools that keep your data safe inside of the library and out – how to secure your library network environment, website, and public PCs, as well as tools and tips you can teach to patrons in computer classes and one-on-one tech sessions. We’ll tackle security myths, passwords, tracking, malware, and more, covering a range of tools from basic to advanced, making this session ideal for any library staff.

Registration Information

Register for the 2016 ALA Annual Conference and Discover Ticketed Events

Costs:

  • LITA Member: $205
  • ALA Member: $270
  • Non Member: $335

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to these webinars and pre-conference, contact LITA at (312) 280-4269 or Mark Beatty, mbeatty@ala.org.

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part dg

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 18:39

Part dg of Amazon crawl..

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Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part di

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 18:34

Part di of Amazon crawl..

This item belongs to: data/ol_data.

This item has files of the following types: Data, Archive BitTorrent, Data, Metadata, Text

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part dl

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 18:29

Part dl of Amazon crawl..

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This item has files of the following types: Data, Archive BitTorrent, Data, Metadata, Text

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part cy

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 18:28

Part cy of Amazon crawl..

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This item has files of the following types: Data, Archive BitTorrent, Data, Metadata, Text

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part dm

planet code4lib - Tue, 2016-05-03 18:25

Part dm of Amazon crawl..

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