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DPLA: DPLA and FamilySearch Partner to Expand Access to Digitized Historical Books Online

Wed, 2016-06-22 12:00

BOSTON/SALT LAKE CITY— In concert with the American Library Association national conference in Orlando, Florida, this week, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) and FamilySearch International, the largest genealogy organization in the world, have signed an agreement that will expand
access to FamilySearch.org’s growing free digital historical book collection to DPLA’s broad audience of users including genealogists, researchers, family historians, students, and more.

Family history/genealogy continues to be a popular and growing hobby. And FamilySearch is a leader in the use of technology to digitally preserve the world’s historic records and books of genealogical relevance for easy search and access online. With this new partnership, DPLA will incorporate metadata from FamilySearch.org’s online digital book collection that will make more than 200,000 family history books discoverable through DPLA’s search portal later this year. From DPLA, users will be able to access the free, fully viewable digital books on FamilySearch.org.  

The digitized historical book collection at FamilySearch.org includes genealogy and family history publications from the archives of some of the most important family history libraries in the world. The collection includes family histories, county and local histories, genealogy magazines and how-to books, gazetteers, and medieval histories and pedigrees.  Tens of thousands of new publications are added yearly.

“We’re excited to see information about FamilySearch’s vast holdings more broadly circulated to those trained to collect, catalog, and distribute useful information. Joint initiatives like this with DPLA help us to further expand access to the rich historic records hidden in libraries and archives worldwide to more curious online patrons,” said David Rencher, FamilySearch’s Chief Genealogy Officer.

Dan Cohen, Executive Director of DPLA, sees the addition of FamilySearch’s digital book collection as part of DPLA’s ongoing mission to be an essential site for family history researchers: “At DPLA, we aspire to collect and share cultural heritage materials that represent individuals, families, and communities from all walks of life across the country, past and present. The FamilySearch collection and our continued engagement with genealogists and family researchers is critical to help bring the stories represented in these treasured resources to life in powerful and exciting ways.”

FamilySearch is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to the discovery and preservation of personal and family histories and stories, introducing individuals to their ancestors through the widespread access to records, and collaborating with others who share this vision. Within DPLA, FamilySearch’s book collection will be discoverable alongside over 13 million cultural heritage materials contributed by DPLA’s growing network of over 2,000 libraries, archives, and museums across the country, opening up all new possibilities for discovery for users and researchers worldwide.  

Find more about FamilySearch or search its resources online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about Digital Public Library of America at https://dp.la.  

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

About the Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America strives to contain the full breadth of human expression, from the written word, to works of art and culture, to records of America’s heritage, to the efforts and data of science. Since launching in April 2013, it has aggregated more than 13 million items from 2,000 institutions. The DPLA is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit.

Media Contacts

DPLA: info@dp.la
FamilySearch: news@familysearch.org

DPLA: DPLA and FamilySearch Partner to Expand Access to Digitized Historical Books Online

Wed, 2016-06-22 12:00

BOSTON/SALT LAKE CITY— In concert with the American Library Association national conference in Orlando, Florida, this week, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) and FamilySearch International, the largest genealogy organization in the world, have signed an agreement that will expand
access to FamilySearch.org’s growing free digital historical book collection to DPLA’s broad audience of users including genealogists, researchers, family historians, students, and more.

Family history/genealogy continues to be a popular and growing hobby. And FamilySearch is a leader in the use of technology to digitally preserve the world’s historic records and books of genealogical relevance for easy search and access online. With this new partnership, DPLA will incorporate metadata from FamilySearch.org’s online digital book collection that will make more than 200,000 family history books discoverable through DPLA’s search portal later this year. From DPLA, users will be able to access the free, fully viewable digital books on FamilySearch.org.  

The digitized historical book collection at FamilySearch.org includes genealogy and family history publications from the archives of some of the most important family history libraries in the world. The collection includes family histories, county and local histories, genealogy magazines and how-to books, gazetteers, and medieval histories and pedigrees.  Tens of thousands of new publications are added yearly.

“We’re excited to see information about FamilySearch’s vast holdings more broadly circulated to those trained to collect, catalog, and distribute useful information. Joint initiatives like this with DPLA help us to further expand access to the rich historic records hidden in libraries and archives worldwide to more curious online patrons,” said David Rencher, FamilySearch’s Chief Genealogy Officer.

Dan Cohen, Executive Director of DPLA, sees the addition of FamilySearch’s digital book collection as part of DPLA’s ongoing mission to be an essential site for family history researchers: “At DPLA, we aspire to collect and share cultural heritage materials that represent individuals, families, and communities from all walks of life across the country, past and present. The FamilySearch collection and our continued engagement with genealogists and family researchers is critical to help bring the stories represented in these treasured resources to life in powerful and exciting ways.”

FamilySearch is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to the discovery and preservation of personal and family histories and stories, introducing individuals to their ancestors through the widespread access to records, and collaborating with others who share this vision. Within DPLA, FamilySearch’s book collection will be discoverable alongside over 13 million cultural heritage materials contributed by DPLA’s growing network of over 2,000 libraries, archives, and museums across the country, opening up all new possibilities for discovery for users and researchers worldwide.  

Find more about FamilySearch or search its resources online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about Digital Public Library of America at https://dp.la.  

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

About the Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America strives to contain the full breadth of human expression, from the written word, to works of art and culture, to records of America’s heritage, to the efforts and data of science. Since launching in April 2013, it has aggregated more than 13 million items from 2,000 institutions. The DPLA is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit.

Media Contacts

DPLA: info@dp.la
FamilySearch: news@familysearch.org

DPLA: DPLA and FamilySearch Partner to Expand Access to Digitized Historical Books Online

Wed, 2016-06-22 12:00

BOSTON/SALT LAKE CITY— In concert with the American Library Association national conference in Orlando, Florida, this week, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) and FamilySearch International, the largest genealogy organization in the world, have signed an agreement that will expand
access to FamilySearch.org’s growing free digital historical book collection to DPLA’s broad audience of users including genealogists, researchers, family historians, students, and more.

Family history/genealogy continues to be a popular and growing hobby. And FamilySearch is a leader in the use of technology to digitally preserve the world’s historic records and books of genealogical relevance for easy search and access online. With this new partnership, DPLA will incorporate metadata from FamilySearch.org’s online digital book collection that will make more than 200,000 family history books discoverable through DPLA’s search portal later this year. From DPLA, users will be able to access the free, fully viewable digital books on FamilySearch.org.  

The digitized historical book collection at FamilySearch.org includes genealogy and family history publications from the archives of some of the most important family history libraries in the world. The collection includes family histories, county and local histories, genealogy magazines and how-to books, gazetteers, and medieval histories and pedigrees.  Tens of thousands of new publications are added yearly.

“We’re excited to see information about FamilySearch’s vast holdings more broadly circulated to those trained to collect, catalog, and distribute useful information. Joint initiatives like this with DPLA help us to further expand access to the rich historic records hidden in libraries and archives worldwide to more curious online patrons,” said David Rencher, FamilySearch’s Chief Genealogy Officer.

Dan Cohen, Executive Director of DPLA, sees the addition of FamilySearch’s digital book collection as part of DPLA’s ongoing mission to be an essential site for family history researchers: “At DPLA, we aspire to collect and share cultural heritage materials that represent individuals, families, and communities from all walks of life across the country, past and present. The FamilySearch collection and our continued engagement with genealogists and family researchers is critical to help bring the stories represented in these treasured resources to life in powerful and exciting ways.”

FamilySearch is a global nonprofit organization dedicated to the discovery and preservation of personal and family histories and stories, introducing individuals to their ancestors through the widespread access to records, and collaborating with others who share this vision. Within DPLA, FamilySearch’s book collection will be discoverable alongside over 13 million cultural heritage materials contributed by DPLA’s growing network of over 2,000 libraries, archives, and museums across the country, opening up all new possibilities for discovery for users and researchers worldwide.  

Find more about FamilySearch or search its resources online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about Digital Public Library of America at https://dp.la.  

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

About the Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America strives to contain the full breadth of human expression, from the written word, to works of art and culture, to records of America’s heritage, to the efforts and data of science. Since launching in April 2013, it has aggregated more than 13 million items from 2,000 institutions. The DPLA is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit.

Media Contacts

DPLA: info@dp.la
FamilySearch: news@familysearch.org

Hydra Project: Lafayette College becomes Hydra’s 100000th Partner

Wed, 2016-06-22 08:43

We are delighted to announce that Lafayette College has become Hydra’s 100000th formal Partner.  But only if you count in binary – otherwise, they’re our 32nd!

Although Lafayette is a “small liberal arts school” (their words), they have been involved with digital repository development for almost a decade and with Fedora since 2013.  They write: “We have now spent over two years working with Hydra, getting to know the community and learning the Hydra way.  We are firmly committed to this trajectory and wish now to become more involved, both technically and through project governance.  We believe that a strengthened commitment would be of mutual benefit and, moreover, would serve as a compelling example for other liberal arts colleges that we are seeking to interest in shared Open Source development.”

Welcome Lafayette!  We look forward to working with you.

Hydra Project: Lafayette College becomes Hydra’s 100000th Partner

Wed, 2016-06-22 08:43

We are delighted to announce that Lafayette College has become Hydra’s 100000th formal Partner.  But only if you count in binary – otherwise, they’re our 32nd!

Although Lafayette is a “small liberal arts school” (their words), they have been involved with digital repository development for almost a decade and with Fedora since 2013.  They write: “We have now spent over two years working with Hydra, getting to know the community and learning the Hydra way.  We are firmly committed to this trajectory and wish now to become more involved, both technically and through project governance.  We believe that a strengthened commitment would be of mutual benefit and, moreover, would serve as a compelling example for other liberal arts colleges that we are seeking to interest in shared Open Source development.”

Welcome Lafayette!  We look forward to working with you.

Hydra Project: Lafayette College becomes Hydra’s 100000th Partner

Wed, 2016-06-22 08:43

We are delighted to announce that Lafayette College has become Hydra’s 100000th formal Partner.  But only if you count in binary – otherwise, they’re our 32nd!

Although Lafayette is a “small liberal arts school” (their words), they have been involved with digital repository development for almost a decade and with Fedora since 2013.  They write: “We have now spent over two years working with Hydra, getting to know the community and learning the Hydra way.  We are firmly committed to this trajectory and wish now to become more involved, both technically and through project governance.  We believe that a strengthened commitment would be of mutual benefit and, moreover, would serve as a compelling example for other liberal arts colleges that we are seeking to interest in shared Open Source development.”

Welcome Lafayette!  We look forward to working with you.

Journal of Web Librarianship: Web-Scale Discovery: Impact on Library Database Web Page Views and Usage

Wed, 2016-06-22 08:06
10.1080/19322909.2016.1191048
Zebulin Evelhoch

Library Tech Talk (U of Michigan): New Computer refresh cycle tool for the Library

Wed, 2016-06-22 00:00

The University of Michigan Library replaces roughly 1/4 of our computers every year. It is a long and complicated process when one considers the number of library staff and the number of computers (both in office and public areas where staff machines are used) involved. This year we use a locally developed tool to streamline the process.

Library Tech Talk (U of Michigan): New Computer refresh cycle tool for the Library

Wed, 2016-06-22 00:00

The University of Michigan Library replaces roughly 1/4 of our computers every year. It is a long and complicated process when one considers the number of library staff and the number of computers (both in office and public areas where staff machines are used) involved. This year we use a locally developed tool to streamline the process.

Library Tech Talk (U of Michigan): New Computer refresh cycle tool for the Library

Wed, 2016-06-22 00:00

The University of Michigan Library replaces roughly 1/4 of our computers every year. It is a long and complicated process when one considers the number of library staff and the number of computers (both in office and public areas where staff machines are used) involved. This year we use a locally developed tool to streamline the process.

Library Tech Talk (U of Michigan): New Computer refresh cycle tool for the Library

Wed, 2016-06-22 00:00

The University of Michigan Library replaces roughly 1/4 of our computers every year. It is a long and complicated process when one considers the number of library staff and the number of computers (both in office and public areas where staff machines are used) involved. This year we use a locally developed tool to streamline the process.

DuraSpace News: VIVO Updates for June 19–New Member U New Mexico, New Site U Wollongong, ALA

Wed, 2016-06-22 00:00

From Mike Conlon, VIVO project director

DuraSpace News: VIVO Updates for June 19–New Member U New Mexico, New Site U Wollongong, ALA

Wed, 2016-06-22 00:00

From Mike Conlon, VIVO project director

DuraSpace News: VIVO Updates for June 19–New Member U New Mexico, New Site U Wollongong, ALA

Wed, 2016-06-22 00:00

From Mike Conlon, VIVO project director

DuraSpace News: VIVO Updates for June 5–Be a VIVO Member, Showcase Your Scholarship

Wed, 2016-06-22 00:00

From Mike Conlon, VIVO project director

Showcase the scholarship at your institution!  This week, the VIVO membership drive began in earnest with an email to all VIVO community members.  I hope you received the email and are considering how your institution might financially support VIVO:

DuraSpace News: VIVO Updates for June 5–Be a VIVO Member, Showcase Your Scholarship

Wed, 2016-06-22 00:00

From Mike Conlon, VIVO project director

Showcase the scholarship at your institution!  This week, the VIVO membership drive began in earnest with an email to all VIVO community members.  I hope you received the email and are considering how your institution might financially support VIVO:

Karen Coyle: Catalog and Context, Part I

Tue, 2016-06-21 18:51
This multi-part post is based on a talk I gave in June, 2016 at ELAG in Copenhagen.

Imagine that you do a search in your GPS system and are given the exact point of the address, but nothing more.

Without some context showing where on the planet the point exists, having the exact location, while accurate, is not useful.



In essence, this is what we provide to users of our catalogs. They do a search and we reply with bibliographic items that meet the letter of that search, but with no context about where those items fit into any knowledge map.

Because we present the catalog as a retrieval tool for unrelated items, users have come to see the library catalog as nothing more than a tool for known item searching. They do not see it as a place to explore topics or to find related works. The catalog wasn't always just a known item finding tool, however. To understand how it came to be one, we need a short visit to Catalogs Past.

Catalogs Past
We can't really compare the library catalog of today to the early book catalogs, since the problem that they had to solve was quite different to what we have today. However, those catalogs can show us what a library catalog was originally meant to be.

A book catalog was a compendium of entry points, mainly authors but in some cases also titles and subjects. The bibliographic data was kept quite brief as every character in the catalog was a cost in terms of type-setting and page real estate. The headings dominated the catalog, and it was only through headings that a user could approach the bibliographic holdings of the library. An alphabetical author list is not much "knowledge organization", but the headings provided an ordered layer over the library's holdings, and were also the only access mechanism to them.

Some of the early card catalogs had separate cards for headings and for bibliographic data. If entries in the catalog had to be hand-written (or later typed) onto cards, the easiest thing was to slot the cards into the catalog behind the appropriate heading without adding heading data to the card itself.

Often there was only one card with a full bibliographic description, and that was the "main entry" card. All other cards were references to a point in the catalog, for example the author's name, where more information could be found.
Again, all bibliographic data was subordinate to a layer of headings that made up the catalog. We can debate how intellectually accurate or useful that heading layer was, but there is no doubt that it was the only entry to the content of the library.

The Printed Card
In 1902 the Library of Congress began printing cards that could be purchased by libraries. The idea was genius. For each item cataloged by LC a card was printed in as many copies as needed. Libraries could buy the number of catalog card "blanks" they required to create all of the entries in their catalogs. The libraries would use as many as needed of the printed cards and type (or write) the desired headings onto the top of the card. Each of these would have the full bibliographic information - an advantage for users who then would not longer need to follow "see" references from headings to the one full entry card in the catalog.


These cards introduced something else that was new: the card would have at the bottom a tracing of the headings that LC was using in its own catalog. This was a savings for the libraries as they could copy LC's practice without incurring their own catalogers' time. This card, for the first time, combined both bibliographic information and heading tracings in a single "record", with the bibliographic information on the card being an entry point to the headings.

Machine-Readable Card Printing
The MAchine Readable Cataloging (MARC) project of the Library of Congress was a major upgrade to card printing technology. By including all of the information needed for card printing in a computer-processable record, LC could take advantage of new technology to stream-line its card production process, and even move into a kind of "print on demand" model. The MARC record was designed to have all of the information needed to print the set of cards for a book; author, title, subjects, and added entries were all included in the record, as well as some additional information that could be used to generate reports such as "new acquisitions" lists.

Here again the bibliographic information and the heading information were together in a single unit, and it even followed the card printing convention of the order of the entries, with the bibliographic description at top, followed by headings. With the MARC record, it was possible to not only print sets of cards, but to actually print the headers on the cards, so that when libraries received a set they were ready to do into the catalog at their respective places.

Next, we'll look at the conversion from printed cards to catalogs using database technology.

-> Part II

Cynthia Ng: A Letter of Thanks

Tue, 2016-06-21 17:09
I have often thought that I have been fortunate to meet a lot of great people during my time in library school and since then in the working world. While I have thanked many of them in writing and in person, I wanted to reflect on how the combination of people and their support has … Continue reading A Letter of Thanks

DPLA: Catch up with DPLA at ALA Annual in Orlando

Tue, 2016-06-21 14:00

The American Library Association’s Annual Conference kicks off later this week in Orlando, Florida and DPLA staffers are excited to hit the road, connect with a fantastic community of librarians and show our support for the city of Orlando.  Here’s your guide to when and where to catch up with DPLA’s staff and community members at ALA Annual.  If you’ll be following the conference from afar, connect with us on Twitter and following the conference at #alaac16.

[S] = DPLA Staff Participating, [K] = Knight Foundation Sponsored Panel, [H] = DPLA Hub and/or Contributing Institution represented

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 12:00pm – 2:00pm: Ebook Working Group Project Update [S]
Location: Networking Uncommons, Orange County Convention Center This meeting is open to all librarians curious about current issues, ongoing projects, and ways to get involved. Attendees will learn how the Ebook Working Group fits in with other library ebook groups, and explore the projects we currently work on, including the Library E-content Access Project (LEAP), SimplyE/Open eBooks, SimplyE for Consortia, Readers First and other library-created ebook projects. Current members of the working groups will have the opportunity to meet and share updates, and connect with potential new members. DPLA Staff Presenting: Michelle Bickert, Ebook Program Manager, and Rachel Frick, Business Development Director SATURDAY, June 25, 2016 8:30am – 10:00am: Linked Data – Globally Connecting Libraries, Archives, and Museums

In the past years, libraries have embraced their role as global participants in the Semantic Web. Developments in library metadata frameworks such as BibFrame and RDA built on standard data models and ontologies including RDF, SKOS and OWL highlight the importance of linking data in an increasingly global environment. What is the status of linked data projects in libraries and other memory institutions internationally? Come hear our speakers address current projects, including RightsStatements.org, opportunities and challenges.

Panelists: Gordon Dunsire, Chair, RDA Steering Committee, Edinburgh, United Kingdom; Reinhold Heuvelmann, Senior Information Standards Specialist, German National Library; Richard Urban, Asst. Professor, School of Information, Florida State University

1:00pm – 2:30pm: Library Consortia, E-books and the Power of Libraries: Innovative Shared E-book Delivery Models from a Library Consortium near You [S]

This program will include an interactive panel discussion of the major trends in e-books and how library consortia are at the forefront of elevating libraries as a major player in the e-book market. Leading models from library consortia that showcase innovation and advocacy including shared collections using open source, commercial and hybrid platforms and the investigation of a national e-book platform for local content from self-published authors and independent publishers.

Panelists: Michelle Bickert, Digital Public Library of America; Veronda Pitchford, Director of Membership Development and Resource Sharing, Reaching Across Illinois Library System; Valerie Horton, Executive Director, Minitex; Greg Pronevitz, Executive Director, Massachusetts Library System

1:00pm – 2:30pm:  Transforming Libraries: Knight News Challenge Winners Announced [K]

For their latest Knight News Challenge, the Knight Foundation asked applicants to submit their best idea answering the question: “How might libraries meet 21st century information needs? This program will include a presentation of the newest winners of the challenge and a panel discussion on transformational change in the library field.

Panelists: Lisa Peet, Associate News Editor at Library JournalFrancesca Rodriquez. Foundation Officer at Madison Public Library Foundation; Matthew Phillips, Manager, Technology Development Team at Harvard University Library

3:00pm – 4:00pm: Can I Use It? New Tools for Determining Rights and (Re)Use Status for Our Digital Collections [S] [K] [H]

Two innovative approaches help libraries address rights and reuse status for growing digital collections. RightsStatements.org addresses the need for standardized rights statements through international collaboration around a shared framework implemented by the Digital Public Library of America, New York Public Library, and other institutions. The Copyright Review Management System provides a toolkit for determining copyright, building off the copyright status work for materials in HathiTrust.

Panelists: Emily Gore, Director for Content, Digital Public Library of America; Greg Cram, Associate Director, Copyright and Information Policy, The New York Public Library; Rick Adler, DPLA Service Hub Coordinator at University of Michigan, School of Information

SUNDAY, June 26, 2016 10:30am – 11:30am:  From the Macro to the Micro: How Small-Scale Digitization Can Make a Big Difference [K] [H]

Digitization programs can be resource rich, even when institutions may be resource poor. Developing a program for the digitization of cultural heritage materials benefits from planning at the macro level, with organizational buy-in and strategic considerations addressed. Once this foundation is in place,an organization can successfully implement a digitization service aligned with organizational mission that benefits important known stakeholders and the wider community. This panel will focus on digitization programs from these two perspectives with emphasis on the creation of a mobile digitization service and how this can be replicated to sustain small-scale digitization programs that can have a huge and positive impact – not only for the institution but for the communities they serve.

Panelists: Caroline Catchpole, Mobile Digitization Specialist at Metropolitan New York Library Council; Natalie Milbrodt, Associate Coordinator at Metadata Services at Queens Library; Jolie O. Graybill, Assistant Director at Minitex; Molly Huber, Outreach Coordinator at Minnesota Digital Library

Additional Knight Foundation Sponsored Panels:  See you in Orlando!

“Greetings from Orlando, The City Beautiful” postcard c. 1930-1945 from the collection of Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth.

DPLA: Catch up with DPLA at ALA Annual in Orlando

Tue, 2016-06-21 14:00

The American Library Association’s Annual Conference kicks off later this week in Orlando, Florida and DPLA staffers are excited to hit the road, connect with a fantastic community of librarians and show our support for the city of Orlando.  Here’s your guide to when and where to catch up with DPLA’s staff and community members at ALA Annual.  If you’ll be following the conference from afar, connect with us on Twitter and following the conference at #alaac16.

[S] = DPLA Staff Participating, [K] = Knight Foundation Sponsored Panel, [H] = DPLA Hub and/or Contributing Institution represented

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 12:00pm – 2:00pm: Ebook Working Group Project Update [S]
Location: Networking Uncommons, Orange County Convention Center This meeting is open to all librarians curious about current issues, ongoing projects, and ways to get involved. Attendees will learn how the Ebook Working Group fits in with other library ebook groups, and explore the projects we currently work on, including the Library E-content Access Project (LEAP), SimplyE/Open eBooks, SimplyE for Consortia, Readers First and other library-created ebook projects. Current members of the working groups will have the opportunity to meet and share updates, and connect with potential new members. DPLA Staff Presenting: Michelle Bickert, Ebook Program Manager, and Rachel Frick, Business Development Director SATURDAY, June 25, 2016 8:30am – 10:00am: Linked Data – Globally Connecting Libraries, Archives, and Museums

In the past years, libraries have embraced their role as global participants in the Semantic Web. Developments in library metadata frameworks such as BibFrame and RDA built on standard data models and ontologies including RDF, SKOS and OWL highlight the importance of linking data in an increasingly global environment. What is the status of linked data projects in libraries and other memory institutions internationally? Come hear our speakers address current projects, including RightsStatements.org, opportunities and challenges.

Panelists: Gordon Dunsire, Chair, RDA Steering Committee, Edinburgh, United Kingdom; Reinhold Heuvelmann, Senior Information Standards Specialist, German National Library; Richard Urban, Asst. Professor, School of Information, Florida State University

1:00pm – 2:30pm: Library Consortia, E-books and the Power of Libraries: Innovative Shared E-book Delivery Models from a Library Consortium near You [S]

This program will include an interactive panel discussion of the major trends in e-books and how library consortia are at the forefront of elevating libraries as a major player in the e-book market. Leading models from library consortia that showcase innovation and advocacy including shared collections using open source, commercial and hybrid platforms and the investigation of a national e-book platform for local content from self-published authors and independent publishers.

Panelists: Michelle Bickert, Digital Public Library of America; Veronda Pitchford, Director of Membership Development and Resource Sharing, Reaching Across Illinois Library System; Valerie Horton, Executive Director, Minitex; Greg Pronevitz, Executive Director, Massachusetts Library System

1:00pm – 2:30pm:  Transforming Libraries: Knight News Challenge Winners Announced [K]

For their latest Knight News Challenge, the Knight Foundation asked applicants to submit their best idea answering the question: “How might libraries meet 21st century information needs? This program will include a presentation of the newest winners of the challenge and a panel discussion on transformational change in the library field.

Panelists: Lisa Peet, Associate News Editor at Library JournalFrancesca Rodriquez. Foundation Officer at Madison Public Library Foundation; Matthew Phillips, Manager, Technology Development Team at Harvard University Library

3:00pm – 4:00pm: Can I Use It? New Tools for Determining Rights and (Re)Use Status for Our Digital Collections [S] [K] [H]

Two innovative approaches help libraries address rights and reuse status for growing digital collections. RightsStatements.org addresses the need for standardized rights statements through international collaboration around a shared framework implemented by the Digital Public Library of America, New York Public Library, and other institutions. The Copyright Review Management System provides a toolkit for determining copyright, building off the copyright status work for materials in HathiTrust.

Panelists: Emily Gore, Director for Content, Digital Public Library of America; Greg Cram, Associate Director, Copyright and Information Policy, The New York Public Library; Rick Adler, DPLA Service Hub Coordinator at University of Michigan, School of Information

SUNDAY, June 26, 2016 10:30am – 11:30am:  From the Macro to the Micro: How Small-Scale Digitization Can Make a Big Difference [K] [H]

Digitization programs can be resource rich, even when institutions may be resource poor. Developing a program for the digitization of cultural heritage materials benefits from planning at the macro level, with organizational buy-in and strategic considerations addressed. Once this foundation is in place,an organization can successfully implement a digitization service aligned with organizational mission that benefits important known stakeholders and the wider community. This panel will focus on digitization programs from these two perspectives with emphasis on the creation of a mobile digitization service and how this can be replicated to sustain small-scale digitization programs that can have a huge and positive impact – not only for the institution but for the communities they serve.

Panelists: Caroline Catchpole, Mobile Digitization Specialist at Metropolitan New York Library Council; Natalie Milbrodt, Associate Coordinator at Metadata Services at Queens Library; Jolie O. Graybill, Assistant Director at Minitex; Molly Huber, Outreach Coordinator at Minnesota Digital Library

Additional Knight Foundation Sponsored Panels:  See you in Orlando!

“Greetings from Orlando, The City Beautiful” postcard c. 1930-1945 from the collection of Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth.

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