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Updated: 20 weeks 6 days ago

OCLC Dev Network: Resolved - Web Services Temporarily Unavailable

Thu, 2014-03-06 21:21

All critical services have been restored. Please contact us at devnet@oclc.org if you continue to experience problems.

 

OCLC Dev Network: Resolved - Web Services Temporarily Unavailable

Thu, 2014-03-06 21:21

All critical services have been restored. Please contact us at devnet@oclc.org if you continue to experience problems.

 

OCLC Dev Network: Web Services Temporarily Unvailable

Thu, 2014-03-06 17:48

OCLC is currently experiencing network issues that are affecting most of our Web services. We are working on the issue and will update you when service has been restored.

We apologize for the inconvenience.

OCLC Dev Network: Web Services Temporarily Unvailable

Thu, 2014-03-06 17:48

OCLC is currently experiencing network issues that are affecting most of our Web services. We are working on the issue and will update you when service has been restored.

We apologize for the inconvenience.

Open Knowledge Foundation: OKFestival streams – concept and how to get help!

Thu, 2014-03-06 16:17

At the Open Knowledge Foundation, we aspire to create environments that connect diverse audiences, thus enabling a diverse groups of thinkers, makers and activists to come together and collaborate to effect change. This year, the Open Knowledge Festival is fuelled by our theory that change happens when you bring together knowledge – which informs change - tools – which enable change – and society – which effects change. Whether you’re building better, cooler tech, creating stronger ideas for the open movement or aiming to shift the gears of society, this year’s OKFestival is the place for you; a place of diverse interests and learning experiences, highlighted by this year’s emphasis on collaboration across the three streams.

In the past, Open Knowledge Foundation events have been organised around topical streams. This has enabled us to grow the movement across communities as diverse as science, transparency, development and linguistics.

However, topical streams have a tendency to further entrench topical silos. Researchers working to open up academia, for example, could almost certainly benefit from learning about the experiences of their colleagues in other fields and from teaching others about their area of expertise. Everyone could benefit from some facetime with a maker who builds cool, useful technology in their sleep! At OKFestival 2014 we want to ensure this type of knowledge sharing in order to offer everyone the chance to cross-collaborate in meaningful, impactful ways. We can all recognise that issues such as privacy, data protection and net neutrality affect all domains within the open space, and we want to ensure that these issues are addressed and worked through from a diversity of perspectives to produce truly global solutions. In order to build an impactful open coalition which can effect change around the world, we need to draw on and incorporate the experiences and knowledge of multiple local communities. Only by avoiding such topical silos and building a cross-topic network of understanding and collaboration can we inform inclusive and context-appropriate open practices.

This year, we are mixing things up to achieve all of this and more! We are promoting cross-domain collaborations and urging you to collectively work through the complex problems that keep resurfacing. The individual sessions which are being submitted and proposed as we speak are pieces of this global puzzle, and this year’s Programme Team is responsible for putting that puzzle together. It’s a tough job, and we don’t want to do it alone, so if you want to start piecing it together before you submit your proposal, then collaborating with your colleagues who work in different spaces is a sure-fire way to create an interesting and attention-worthy session. We fully encourage you to reach out to those colleagues who you believe may hold a piece of your puzzle, and we’ve set up this mailing list for you to do just that.

We understand that by mixing things up, questions are sure to arise. That is why we have put together this handy page with tips and tricks for organising your session, booted that aforementioned mailing list for session organisers to discuss their proposals and foster new collaborations, and even organised two hangouts (Friday and Monday – pick one!) to give you the opportunity to ask questions and be inspired.

Finally, we need your help. We believe that at the heart of the open movement are values such as diversity and inclusivity. We need you to make sure that your OKFestival is as diverse and inclusive as possible, because as we all know, there’s so much more to learn that way. If you know awesome people who have something key to say about sharing knowledge, building amazing tools and stirring up society to make an impact, then send them our way. If that’s you, then what are you waiting for?! Start thinking about a collaborative, interactive and powerful session for OKFestival!

Open Knowledge Foundation: OKFestival streams – concept and how to get help!

Thu, 2014-03-06 16:17

At the Open Knowledge Foundation, we aspire to create environments that connect diverse audiences, thus enabling a diverse groups of thinkers, makers and activists to come together and collaborate to effect change. This year, the Open Knowledge Festival is fuelled by our theory that change happens when you bring together knowledge – which informs change - tools – which enable change – and society – which effects change. Whether you’re building better, cooler tech, creating stronger ideas for the open movement or aiming to shift the gears of society, this year’s OKFestival is the place for you; a place of diverse interests and learning experiences, highlighted by this year’s emphasis on collaboration across the three streams.

In the past, Open Knowledge Foundation events have been organised around topical streams. This has enabled us to grow the movement across communities as diverse as science, transparency, development and linguistics.

However, topical streams have a tendency to further entrench topical silos. Researchers working to open up academia, for example, could almost certainly benefit from learning about the experiences of their colleagues in other fields and from teaching others about their area of expertise. Everyone could benefit from some facetime with a maker who builds cool, useful technology in their sleep! At OKFestival 2014 we want to ensure this type of knowledge sharing in order to offer everyone the chance to cross-collaborate in meaningful, impactful ways. We can all recognise that issues such as privacy, data protection and net neutrality affect all domains within the open space, and we want to ensure that these issues are addressed and worked through from a diversity of perspectives to produce truly global solutions. In order to build an impactful open coalition which can effect change around the world, we need to draw on and incorporate the experiences and knowledge of multiple local communities. Only by avoiding such topical silos and building a cross-topic network of understanding and collaboration can we inform inclusive and context-appropriate open practices.

This year, we are mixing things up to achieve all of this and more! We are promoting cross-domain collaborations and urging you to collectively work through the complex problems that keep resurfacing. The individual sessions which are being submitted and proposed as we speak are pieces of this global puzzle, and this year’s Programme Team is responsible for putting that puzzle together. It’s a tough job, and we don’t want to do it alone, so if you want to start piecing it together before you submit your proposal, then collaborating with your colleagues who work in different spaces is a sure-fire way to create an interesting and attention-worthy session. We fully encourage you to reach out to those colleagues who you believe may hold a piece of your puzzle, and we’ve set up this mailing list for you to do just that.

We understand that by mixing things up, questions are sure to arise. That is why we have put together this handy page with tips and tricks for organising your session, booted that aforementioned mailing list for session organisers to discuss their proposals and foster new collaborations, and even organised two hangouts (Friday and Monday – pick one!) to give you the opportunity to ask questions and be inspired.

Finally, we need your help. We believe that at the heart of the open movement are values such as diversity and inclusivity. We need you to make sure that your OKFestival is as diverse and inclusive as possible, because as we all know, there’s so much more to learn that way. If you know awesome people who have something key to say about sharing knowledge, building amazing tools and stirring up society to make an impact, then send them our way. If that’s you, then what are you waiting for?! Start thinking about a collaborative, interactive and powerful session for OKFestival!

OCLC Dev Network: Web Services Temporarily Unavailable

Thu, 2014-03-06 15:18

OCLC is currently experiencing network issues that are affecting most of our Web services. We are working on the issue and will update you when service has been restored.

 

OCLC Dev Network: Web Services Temporarily Unavailable

Thu, 2014-03-06 15:18

OCLC is currently experiencing network issues that are affecting most of our Web services. We are working on the issue and will update you when service has been restored.

 

LITA: LITA Preconferences Held at ALA Annual

Thu, 2014-03-06 06:18

LITA is offing three full day preconferences at ALA Annual Conference in Las Vegas, all held Friday, June 27 from 8:30 am – 4:00 pm.

Managing Data: Tools for Plans and Data Scrubbing with Abigail Goben, University of Illinois, Chicago; Sarah Sheehan, George Mason University; Nathan B. Putnam; University of Maryland. As data continues to come to the fore, new tools are becoming available for librarians to assist faculty and use with their own data. This preconference would focus on the DMPTool and OpenRefine. The DMPTool will be presented to demonstrate customization features, review data management plans, best and worst practices, and writing a data plan for a data set a library may collect. OpenRefine will be demonstrated with sample data to show potential use with library data sets and more of the data lifecycle process; metadata will also be covered.

Practical Linked Data with Open Source with Galen Charlton, Equinox Software; Jodi Schneider, DERI, NUI Galway; Dan Scott, Laurentian University; Richard Urban, Florida State University. Linked Data can improve how libraries share their metadata, harvest it from non-library sources, and build better applications to connect patrons with library resources. However, what does this mean for the daily work of catalogers? This preconference will narrow the gap between theory and practice by presenting the state of the art for Linked Data management in open source integrated library systems and giving participants the chance to try it out.

Web Therapy with Nina McHale, ninermac.net; Christopher Evjy, Jefferson County Library. Having trouble managing your library’s web site? Content in chaos? Platform the pits? Statistics staggering? The doctors are in! In this full-day preconference, we will tackle a number of tough topics to help cure the ills that are keeping your library site from achieving total wellness. Specific topics will be determined by a survey sent in advance to attendees. Enjoy networking and problem solving with fellow web-minded library folks.

How to Register

To register for any of these events, you can include them with your initial conference registration or add them later using the unique link in your email confirmation. If you don’t have your registration confirmation handy, you can request a copy by emailing alaannual@compusystems.com. You also have the option of registering for a preconfernce only.

  • Register online through June 20
  • Call ALA Registration at 1-800-974-3084
  • Onsite registration will also be accepted in Las Vegas.

ALA Equitable Access to Electronic Content: School librarians supported in ConnectEDucators program

Wed, 2014-03-05 22:59

A new program written into President Obama’s 2015 budget request includes professional development funding for school librarians, teachers and leaders who provide high-speed internet access to students. The Obama Administration requested that $200 million dollars be allocated to ConnectEDucators, a new initiative that will ensure that school professionals are well-prepared to use high-speed internet resources in a way that improves classroom instruction and student learning. The ConnectEDucators program is an extension of the Administration’s ConnectED initiative.

Roberto Rodriguez, special assistant to the President for Education Policy and the Domestic Policy Council, confirmed today that the Administration considers school libraries a vital component to student achievement. Rodriguez said that school librarians would qualify for professional development funds available from the ConnectEDucators program.

On a related note, President Obama’s budget requests funding support for school librarians through the Department of Education’s Race to the Top program. The Equity and Opportunity Program tasks the states and school districts in high poverty areas with providing ways to keep the best educators in their schools, and this would include school librarians.

The post School librarians supported in ConnectEDucators program appeared first on District Dispatch.

Tennant, Roy: When You Free the Data From MARC You Are the Roy

Wed, 2014-03-05 18:51

Code4Lib is a unique place. I don’t know of another space like it in the library world. It has inside jokes all over the place, from the love of bacon, to the poking of fun at OCLC as an organization and me as an individual. Both myself and my employer (OCLC) are good for it, and we both engage with and support this community with what I hope is friendly good humor.

From the perspective of the organization, OCLC has been the single largest and most consistent sponsor of the Code4Lib Conference since the beginning. I like to think I had something to do with that. I’ve been an active participant in the Code4Lib community for many years, thanks to Dan Chudnov, who first turned me on to what was at the time a nascent group of library coders. What it has grown into has astonished me and likely others who were early participants.

So recently when there began a Code4Lib meme about “Roy4Lib” (believe me, you had to be there), I wasn’t surprised. But for me, the apex of the inside joke was this post by my friend Ross Singer:

When you’re alone and you think you hear the tinkling of ice cubes in a glass and the faint smell of Scotch, that was Roy.

That person building a treehouse as you drive past, that was Roy.

Out of the corner of your eye, there was a mustached man, that was Roy.

When you delete a MARC record, you are the Roy.

Clearly all of this had precedent, from my love of single malts to my legacy of building treehouses, to my ever-present mustache (which my daughters have forbidden me from shaving), to my throwing down the gauntlet that “MARC Must Die” way back in 2002. And Ross had it almost, completely, thoroughly, right.

But I have one small quibble. I don’t want you to delete a MARC record, I want you to free the data from MARC. And thankfully, this is exactly what we are doing at OCLC, where I work.

I wrote about just one of our most recent efforts here. But we have been doing this for a while. And we will continue to do so, while at the same time supporting MARC as the current foundational standard for library data.

But feel free to go forth and crowbar the data out of MARC. Be the Roy.

LITA: Jobs in Information Technology: March 5

Wed, 2014-03-05 18:21

New vacancy listings are posted weekly on Wednesday at approximately 12 noon Central Time. They appear under New This Week and under the appropriate regional listing. Postings remain on the LITA Job Site for a minimum of four weeks.

New This Week

Circulation and Systems Librarian,  Kalamazoo College Library, Kalamazoo, MI

Electronic Services Librarian/Information Technology Liaison,  Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh, PA

Software Engineer, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Visit the LITA Job Site for more available jobs and for information on submitting a  job posting.

Open Knowledge Foundation: Tips & Tricks – A Hangout for OKFestival Session Planners

Wed, 2014-03-05 17:45

The Open Knowledge Festival call for session proposals is now open!

The better the proposals, the better the festival, so we’re inviting you to put on your thinking caps and come up with revolutionarily brilliant ideas for sessions at OKFestival 2014.

We know you can do it, and we know you’ll make this festival a huge success by bringing your input to it. To help you fine-tune your ideas –  and ask any burning questions  that you may have – the Festival Programme Team are going to be on hand via online hangouts over the next week to give you some pointers.

In fact, we’re happy to announce three new tools to help make the magic happen:

  • we’ve created a public mailing list which you can use to connect and team up with other session planners, to share ideas, plans and tips for OKFestival sessions

  • we’ve created a brand-new webpage on our festival site with tips to help you build and facilitate the best sessions possible for/at OKFestival

  • we’re hosting two live hangouts (links below) where you can ask for advice or input on your ideas from us, and exchange tips with each other to help make your proposal shine

Hangouts will be held on Friday, March 7 at 21:00 GMT (22:00 CET/ 13:00 PST/ 16:00 EST) and on Monday, March 10, at 10:00 GMT (11:00 CET/ 13:00 EAT/ 18:00 HKT). We’ll be interacting with you live via etherpad and Twitter – #okfestsessions – as well as via the Google+ Hangouts Q&A App where you can post your questions on the day. The hangouts will be streamed direct to our YouTube channel and G+ page.

If you can’t join us for whatever reason, don’t worry - the resultant YouTube videos will be archived so you can watch them later and you can also continue to read and contribute to the etherpad after the hangouts.

We’re looking forward to building this year’s programme with you!

ALA Equitable Access to Electronic Content: It may not be the Academy Award but there’s still time…

Wed, 2014-03-05 16:46

Photo by mikebaudio via flickr.

The American Library Association’s Office for Information Technology Policy is accepting nominations for two prestigious awards. The first is the L. Ray Patterson Award: In Support of Users’ Rights. The Patterson Copyright Award recognizes contributions of an individual or group that pursues and supports the Constitutional purpose of the U.S. Copyright Law, fair use and the public domain. Professor Patterson was a copyright scholar and historian who argued that the statutory copyright monopoly had grown well out of proportion, to the extent that the purpose of the copyright law—to advance learning—was hindered.

Patterson co-authored (with Stanley W. Lindberg) The Nature of Copyright: A Law of Users’ Rights and was particularly interested in libraries and their role in advancing users rights. He served as expert counsel to Representative Bob Kastenmaier throughout the drafting of the Copyright Law of 1976. Previous winners of the Patterson Award include Kenneth D. Crews, Peter Jaszi, and Fred von Lohmann. The Patterson Award is a crystal vase trophy.

The second award is the Robert Oakley Memorial Scholarship Fund, sponsored in collaboration with the Library Copyright Alliance (LCA). This award is granted to an early-to-mid-career librarian who is pursuing copyright scholarship and public policy. Professor Oakley was a member of the LCA representing the American Association of Law Librarians, and a long-time member of the International Library Federation of Libraries Associations and Institutions (IFLA), advocating for libraries at the World Intellectual Property Organization and UNESCO.

Oakley was a recognized leader in law librarianship and library management who also maintained a profound commitment to public policy and the rights of library users and was a mentor to many librarians interested in copyright policy. The $1,000 scholarship award may be used for travel necessary to conduct, attend conferences, release from library duties or other reasonable and appropriate research expenses.

The deadline for nominations has been extended to March 31, 2014. For more information on nomination details, see the links above. If you have additional questions, contact Carrie Russell, OITP Director of the Program on Public Access to Information, at crussell@alawash.org.

The post It may not be the Academy Award but there’s still time… appeared first on District Dispatch.

OCLC Dev Network: Coming Soon: New and Improved Developer Network Website

Wed, 2014-03-05 14:56

Developer Network will be going live with a whole new website this Monday, March 10th!

read more

OCLC Dev Network: Coming Soon: New and Improved Developer Network Website

Wed, 2014-03-05 14:56

This is a project we’ve been working on for a while now and it’s exciting to finally be able to share it with all of you. While we can't wait to tell you about all of the bells and whistles, it’s most important that you know that the new site will be right here at the same address and all of the critical information you’ve been using will still be available. Our URL patterns will be changing somewhat and we’ve put re-directs in place to save as many of your bookmarks as possible. Still, you’ll probably want to take some time to explore the new site and make sure you can locate your favorites.

Rosenthal, David: Windows XP

Wed, 2014-03-05 14:00
The idea that format migration is integral to digital preservation was for a long time reinforced by people's experience of format incompatibility in Microsoft's Office suite. Microsoft's business model used to depend on driving the upgrade cycle by introducing gratuitous forward incompatibility, new versions of the software being set up to write formats that older versions could not render. But what matters for digital preservation is backwards incompatibility; newer versions of the software being unable to render content written by older versions. Six years ago the limits of Microsoft's ability to introduce backwards incompatibility were dramatically illustrated when they tried to remove support for some really old formats.

The reason for this fiasco was that Microsoft greatly over-estimated its ability to impose the costs of migrating old content on their customers, and the customer's ability to resist. Old habits die hard. Microsoft is trying to end support of Windows XP and Office 2003 on April 8 but it isn't providing cost-effective upgrade paths for what is now Microsoft's fastest-growing installed base. Joel Hruska writes:Microsoft has come under serious fire for some significant missteps in this process, including a total lack of actual upgrade options. What Microsoft calls an upgrade involves completely wiping the PC and reinstalling a fresh OS copy on it — or ideally, buying a new device. Microsoft has misjudged how strong its relationship is with consumers and failed to acknowledge its own shortcomings. Not providing an upgrade utility is one example — but so is the general lack of attractive upgrade prices or even the most basic understanding of why users haven't upgraded.This resistance to change has obvious implications for digital preservation.

Denton, William: The Norman Conquests

Wed, 2014-03-05 03:33

I had the enormous pleasure on Saturday and Monday of seeing the three plays that make up The Norman Conquests by Alan Ayckbourn, put on by the Soulpepper company here in Toronto. This review of the October 2013 production explains well how well done they all were and what great plays they are. It was more excellent work by Soulpepper; even more enjoyable than usual because seeing three plays in such a short time—two Saturday and one Monday—concentrates and intensifies everything.

Here I note two especially interesting about the trilogy: the chronology and the fact that Norman is a librarian. I admit that second fact is of limited interest to non-librarians, but after all I myself am a librarian.

The books on stage were perfect. These are in the sitting room; there were Agatha Christies in the dining room. Chronology

The three plays all take place over the same weekend with the same six characters, but Table Manners is set in the dining room, Living Together in the sitting room, and Round and Round the Garden in the garden. Each has two acts with two scenes, but the times are staggered, so as you see them—I saw them in that order—the pieces all lock together, and when someone enters a room in one play you realize you saw them leave from another room in another play, or when someone says something offhand in one play you realize they’re covering up an intense experience from another play.

Table Manners

  • I.i: The dining room. Saturday evening, 6 pm
  • I.ii: The dining room. Sunday morning. 9 am
  • II.i: The dining room. Sunday evening, 8 pm
  • II.ii: The dining room. Monday morning, 8 am

Living Together

  • I.i: The sitting room. Saturday, 6:30 pm
  • I.ii: The sitting room. Saturday, 8 pm
  • II.i: The sitting room. Sunday, 9 pm
  • II.ii: The sitting room. Monday, 8 am

Round and Round the Garden

  • I.i: The garden. Saturday, 5:30 pm
  • I.ii: The garden. Saturday, 9 pm
  • II.i: The garden. Sunday, 11 am
  • II.ii: The garden. Monday, 9 am

Round and Round the Garden comes third in the sequence but contains the weekend in time: it begins first, Saturday at 5:30 pm, and ends last, in the garden on Monday morning at 9 am when people are leaving.

Seeing all three, and spending over six hours with the six actors—while sitting in the front row of an arena theatre!—was a marvellous experience.

Digression

The Norman Conquests was first produced at the Library Theatre, which at the time was inside the library in Scarborough in Yorkshire.

Ayckbourn’s official web site has a huge amount of material about The Norman Conquests.

Librarian

One of the characters is a librarian: Norman, played by Albert Schultz. He does it as a great hairy shambling kind of a man, as many male librarians are, and suitably dressed in a cardigan, as all librarians are. There are a few good library-related lines:

From Table Manners:

I.ii:

Norman: The trouble is, I was born in the wrong damn body. Look at me. A gigolo trapped in a haystack. The tragedy of my life. Norman Dewers—gigolo and assistant librarian.

II.i

Ruth: Forget it. You couldn’t possibly take Norman away from me. That assumes I own him in the first place. I’ve never done that. I always feel with Norman that I have him on loan from somewhere. Like one of his library books. I’ll get a card one day informing me he’s overdue and there’s a fine to pay on him.

From Living Together:

I.i:

Sarah: I thought you were in a hurry to go somewhere, Norman.

Norman: Not at all.

Reg: Yes, I thought you said you had a—librarian’s conference.

Norman: It’s been cancelled.

Reg: When?

Norman: About ten seconds ago. Due to lack of interest.

Reg: Funny lot these librarians.

I.i:

Sarah: It’s a bit late to consider his feelings now, isn’t it? Having tried to steal Annie from under his nose.

Norman: I wasn’t stealing her, I was borrowing her. For the weekend.

Sarah: Makes her sound like one of your library books.

I.i:

Annie: What are you going to tell Ruth?

Norman: What I was going to tell her anyway. I’ve been on a conference.

Annie: Which finished early?

Norman: Something like that. We ran out of things to talk about. What does it matter? She won’t care. She probably thinks I’m in the attic mending the roof.

Annie: I didn’t know Assistant Librarians had conferences.

Norman: Everybody has conferences.

II.ii:

Ruth: You’re supposed to be at work too.

Norman: I was taken ill, haven’t you heard?

Ruth: I’m amazed they keep you on.

Norman: I’m a very good librarian, that’s why. I know where all the dirty bits are in all the books.

From Round and Round the Garden:

III.I

Tom: Oh. I thought you said you were staying.

Norman: No, I’m just passing through on my way to East Grinstead.

Tom: Really? Business?

Norman: Yes. International Association of Assistant Librarians Annual Conference.

Tom: Jolly good.

III.ii:

Norman: I was brought up to believe it was very insulting to sleep with your wife or any lady. A gentleman stays eagerly awake. He sleeps at his work. That’s what work’s for. Why do you think they have SILENCE notices in the library? So as not to disturb me in my little nook behind the biography shelves. L–P.

Ruth: They’ll sack you.

Norman: They daren’t. I reorganized the Main Index. When I die, the secret dies with me.

ALA Equitable Access to Electronic Content: 15 Museums, Libraries Nominated National Medals

Wed, 2014-03-05 00:22

The Institute of Museum and Library Services recently nominated 15 exemplary libraries for National Medals for their service to their communities. In its 20th year, the National Medal is the nation’s highest honor conferred on libraries and museums, and celebrates institutions that make a difference for individuals, families, and communities.

This year’s honorees will come from a variety of library and museum institutions, including public libraries, cultural library centers and multiple county library systems.

The Institute of Museum and Library Services is encouraging those who have visited finalist libraries and museums to share their story on their Facebook page: www.facebook.com/USIMLS.

National Medal nominees include:

  • Pima County Public Library (Tucson, Ariz.)
  • Los Angeles Public Library (Los Angeles, Calif.)
  • Sacramento Public Library (Sacramento, Calif.)
  • Hartford Public Library (Hartford, Conn.)
  • Otis Library (Norwich, Conn.)
  • Athens-Clarke County Library (Athens, Ga.)
  • Chicago Public Library (Chicago, Ill.)
  • Booth Library (Eastern Illinois University) (Charleston, Ill.)
  • Cecil County Public Library (Elkton, Md.)
  • Yiddish Book Center (Amherst, Mass.)
  • Mid-Continent Public Library (Independence, Mo.)
  • Las Vegas-Clark County Library District (Las Vegas, Nev.)
  • Octavia Fellin Public Library (Gallup, N.M.)
  • Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library (New York, N.Y.)
  • Bertha Voyer Memorial Library (Honey Grove, Texas)

The post 15 Museums, Libraries Nominated National Medals appeared first on District Dispatch.

Engard, Nicole: Bookmarks for March 4, 2014

Tue, 2014-03-04 20:30

Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on <a href=

  • P2PU A University for the Web. Built by an open community.

Digest powered by RSS Digest

The post Bookmarks for March 4, 2014 appeared first on What I Learned Today....

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