Lightning Talks

On Wednesday and Thursday there are 1 hour 15 minute slots for Lightning Talks. A lightning talk is a fast paced 5 minute talk on the topic of your choosing. If you'd like to do a lightning talk please add your name, topic to this page. You can do more than one if you want, but if the lots fill up (there are 30 of them) you might have to choose which one you want to do.

Mark Jason Dominus has a nice page about lightning talks, which includes this summary of why you might want to do one:

Maybe you've never given a talk before, and you'd like to start small. For a Lightning Talk, you don't need to make slides, and if you do decide to make slides, you only need to make three.

Maybe you're nervous and you're afraid you'll mess up. It's a lot easier to plan and deliver a five minute talk than it is to deliver a long talk. And if you do mess up, at least the painful part will be over quickly.

Maybe you don't have much to say. Maybe you just want to ask a question, or invite people to help you with your project, or boast about something you did, or tell a short cautionary story. These things are all interesting and worth talking about, but there might not be enough to say about them to fill up thirty minutes.

Maybe you have a lot of things to say, and you're already going to give a long talk on one of them, and you don't want to hog the spotlight. There's nothing wrong with giving several Lightning Talks. Hey, they're only five minutes.

Lightning Talks Given at the Conference

Wednesday, February 15

  1. Total Eclipse Of My Brain (Ed Summers)
  2. [Link PURLs|http://purl.org/net/linkpurl] and Firefox (Devon Smith)
  3. Call to Action: Deprecate OAI Sets! (Rob Sanderson)
  4. Cross-Site Scripting Attacks (Eric Hellman)
  5. Object Relational Mapping in 21 days^W^W 5 minutes (Ed Summers)
  6. The Amazing Linkr8r 3 min (Charles Lockwood)
  7. Making the case for Link Resolver Routers (Ross Singer)
  8. Down and Dirty Metadata Analysis (Roy Tennant)

Thursday, February 16

  1. LinkPURLs and Firefox (Devon Smith)
  2. xISBN and Bookmarklets (Jeff Young)
  3. (Vendors - ) Give us Our Data! (Aaron Krowne)
  4. How to Share User Data without getting Subpoenaed (Casey Durfee)
  5. Repurpose/Syndication of Scopus DB Results on Library Webpages (Jim Robertson)
  6. Perl Script for Interpreting LC Call Numbers (Jeff Davis)
  7. OCLC License (Thom Hickey)
  8. Google Maps and SVG (Art Rhyno)
  9. Extending and Customizing Moveable Type for Library Weblogs (Karen Coombs)
  10. The COinS Generator (Eric Hellman)
  11. Standardized Image Production and Metadata Storage for Libraries and Archives (John Sarnowski)
  12. Using heuristics to improve OpenURL linking to OPAC holdings (Tom Burton-West)
  13. Spreading the word about code for libraries: [a book project |http://www.chandospublishing.com/catalogue/record_detail.php?recordID=91] (Mark Dahl)
  14. Backend Agnostic Customization with "brand files" (Brian Tingle)
  15. MARC is UNdead or how what will the catalog look like when most resources are electronic? (Kyle Banerjee)
  16. Exposing yourself^W^W data where users are looking (Walter Lewis)
  17. EOIN & Oddments (Noel Peden)
  18. PLINKIT - websites for the small public library (Darci Hanning)
  19. Quick Look at MarcEdit 5.0 (Terry Reese)
  20. Why Libraries Should Support the Free Software Foundation (Dan Chudnov)

Friday, February 17

  1. Native XML Database Demo (Al Cornish)
  2. Choose Your Own Adventure Conference (Devon Smith)
  3. OCLC Software Contest (Thom Hickey)
  4. Panizzi!! (Walter Lewis, with Peter Binkley virtually)